Grazia Admits to Photoshopping Kate Middleton

It's a sad day when women as slim as Kate Middleton get the photoshop treatment. Alas, this is the world we live in. When Grazia's special edition wedding issue came out shortly after the big event, readers were convinced that the magazine had digitally whittled Kate's already-whittled waist. Indeed, The Duchess of Cambridge's waist (in the image at left) does look peternaturally tiny. After initially denying the rumors Grazia finally published an apology and explanation in their most recent issue, reports the Daily Mail.
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Hayley Phelan
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It's a sad day when women as slim as Kate Middleton get the photoshop treatment. Alas, this is the world we live in. When Grazia's special edition wedding issue came out shortly after the big event, readers were convinced that the magazine had digitally whittled Kate's already-whittled waist. Indeed, The Duchess of Cambridge's waist (in the image at left) does look peternaturally tiny. After initially denying the rumors Grazia finally published an apology and explanation in their most recent issue, reports the Daily Mail.
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It's a sad day when women as slim as Kate Middleton get the photoshop treatment. Alas, this is the world we live in.

When Grazia's special edition wedding issue came out shortly after the Royal Wedding in April, readers were convinced that the magazine had digitally whittled Kate's already-whittled waist. Indeed, The Duchess of Cambridge's waist (in the image at left) does look preternaturally tiny. After initially denying the rumors Grazia finally published an apology and explanation in their most recent issue, reports the Daily Mail.

Conveniently, Grazia says it was all a big misunderstanding. Apparently the magazine wanted to feature Middleton solo on it's cover but since the Duchess was not photographed alone, they had to photoshop William out of the picture--particularly his arm around her waist--untintentionally creating a slimmer-looking Middleton. "[Grazia] would like to reassure all our readers that we did not purposely make any alternations to the Duchess of Cambridge's image to make her appear slimmer, and we are sorry if this process gave that impression," the magazine said in a published statement.

While the explantion is plausible enough--we don't need to tell you how much photo editors rely on photoshop to get the image they want--it's still disconcerting that the cover went to print with such an unnaturally skinny Middleton. What do you think? Do you buy the magazine's excuse?