Kristen Stewart Like You've Never Seen Her Before in W's September Issue

Kristen Stewart smolders, cat-eyed and '60s style, on the cover of W's September issue, photographed by Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott and styled by Edward Enninful. Inside, Stewart, who normally looks a bit scowl-ly and tomboyish, is pure smoky sexy '60s glamor wearing Gucci, Dolce & Gabbana, and Junya Watanabe. Check out the pix and highlights from Stewart's interview with Lynn Hirschberg in which she talks about how her big break involved singing a song about a dreidl, says she's still insecure about her "tomboy" quality, and opens up about saying goodbye to Bella Swan.
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Leah Chernikoff
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Kristen Stewart smolders, cat-eyed and '60s style, on the cover of W's September issue, photographed by Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott and styled by Edward Enninful. Inside, Stewart, who normally looks a bit scowl-ly and tomboyish, is pure smoky sexy '60s glamor wearing Gucci, Dolce & Gabbana, and Junya Watanabe. Check out the pix and highlights from Stewart's interview with Lynn Hirschberg in which she talks about how her big break involved singing a song about a dreidl, says she's still insecure about her "tomboy" quality, and opens up about saying goodbye to Bella Swan.
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Kristen Stewart smolders, cat-eyed and '60s style, on the cover of W's September issue, photographed by Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott and styled by Edward Enninful. Inside, Stewart, who normally looks a bit scowl-ly and tomboyish, is pure smoky sexy '60s glamor wearing Gucci, Dolce & Gabbana, and Junya Watanabe. Check out the pix and highlights from Stewart's interview with Lynn Hirschberg in which she talks about how her big break involved singing a song about a dreidl, says she's still insecure about her "tomboy" quality, and opens up about saying goodbye to Bella Swan. On her big break:

It’s weird, because I would be the last person in my school to be in plays, but I was forced to sing a song in a school thing. I sang a dreidl song, which is funny for me. I’ve never celebrated Hanukkah—it wasn’t in my upbringing, but it was one of those deals where everybody has to pick a song or participate somehow in the chorus. It wasn’t the normal dreidl song; I can’t really remember the words, but it was a more serious dreidl song. The dreidl was huge, it was really honored. And that’s how I met my agent, who was in the audience. I was eight. I was nine when I did my first movie, The Safety of Objects.

On her "tomboy quality":

I have brothers, and that so-called boyish quality was something that I was deathly self-conscious about when I was younger. I was, like, No, I’m a girl. Actually, I’m still embarrassed to say that.

On vampires:

I fucking love me a vampire [Laughs]. I was 17 when I read Twilight, and at the time it was so perfect for me. The script was about young kids who think they can handle stuff that they just can’t. And they’re going to do it anyway. Because, why not? Just torture yourself. I relate to that. Vampires are a little dangerous—and we girls like to test ourselves.

On saying goodbye to Bella Swan:

I’d been anticipating that end-of-Bella moment. I was going, Oh, my God—I wonder how I’m going to feel. And the last scene of the shoot was at the wedding. Every single character was there on set. At the end of that day, I was kind of whacked. And so I never really had that moment then. Instead, it happened later. We needed to film one more sort of honeymoon scene and we went to the Virgin Islands. After that scene, my true final scene, I felt like I could shoot up into the night sky and every pore of my body would shoot light. I felt lighter than I’ve ever felt in my life.

**All photos: Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott for W