New Consumer Study Finds that Both French and American Women Lie Their Faces Off About Makeup Use

Benefit’s new mascara, called “They’re Real!” is accompanied by the cheeky ad at left. This Benefit campaign is a little jab at the beauty industry, which has found itself in a heap of trouble lately for photoshopping ads--mascara ads in particular have a long, tawdry history of showing lashes enhanced by things other than mascara. Makeup itself, if you think about it, is sort of a lie. Concealer hides our scars and blemishes. Mascara makes our lashes look longer and our eyes bigger. Blush makes us look like we’ve just emerged from a romantic interlude, thus making us more attractive to potential mates. Have you ever thought about how much you lie about things, and lie about your beauty habits in particular? (Me, fake bake? No way! I was totally out in the sun all day yesterday!) To further promote the mascara, Benefit commissioned a consumer study of French and American women to determine how much they lie about makeup. They surveyed 300 women in each country between the ages of 18 and 54. The results are fascinating.
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Benefit’s new mascara, called “They’re Real!” is accompanied by the cheeky ad at left. This Benefit campaign is a little jab at the beauty industry, which has found itself in a heap of trouble lately for photoshopping ads--mascara ads in particular have a long, tawdry history of showing lashes enhanced by things other than mascara. Makeup itself, if you think about it, is sort of a lie. Concealer hides our scars and blemishes. Mascara makes our lashes look longer and our eyes bigger. Blush makes us look like we’ve just emerged from a romantic interlude, thus making us more attractive to potential mates. Have you ever thought about how much you lie about things, and lie about your beauty habits in particular? (Me, fake bake? No way! I was totally out in the sun all day yesterday!) To further promote the mascara, Benefit commissioned a consumer study of French and American women to determine how much they lie about makeup. They surveyed 300 women in each country between the ages of 18 and 54. The results are fascinating.
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Benefit’s new mascara, called “They’re Real!” is accompanied by the cheeky ad at left. This Benefit campaign is a little jab at the beauty industry, which has found itself in a heap of trouble lately for photoshopping ads--mascara ads in particular have a long, tawdry history of showing lashes enhanced by things other than mascara.

Makeup itself, if you think about it, is sort of a lie. Concealer hides our scars and blemishes. Mascara makes our lashes look longer and our eyes bigger. Blush makes us look like we’ve just emerged from a romantic interlude, thus making us more attractive to potential mates.

Have you ever thought about how much you lie about things, and lie about your beauty habits in particular? (Me, fake bake? No way! I was totally out in the sun all day yesterday!) To further promote the mascara, Benefit commissioned a consumer study of French and American women to determine how much they lie about makeup. They surveyed 300 women in each country between the ages of 18 and 54. The results are fascinating. -About 60% of both French and American women lie at least once a week. If you’re between the ages of 18-24, it’s about 70%

-Weirdly, younger women lie more about makeup use, the amount of money they spend, and the time it takes them to get ready.

-French women lie about their age slightly more frequently than American women.

-French women lie more about their number of sexual partners (shocker).

-Neither group lies all that frequently about how often they wash their hair or whether they wash their makeup off at night.

-More French women lie to get out of trouble than American women (50% vs. 17%) and to “get what they want” (27% vs. 11%). However, American women will lie more often than French women “to protect someone’s feelings (64% vs. 52%) Cold, French ladies, cold.

-Mascara ownership is similar in both countries, with most women owning more than two mascaras.

-The most surprising fact? The “one beauty product you won’t leave the house without applying first is....’ *drumroll*: Americans chose concealer, followed closely by lipstick/lip gloss. French women chose mascara first, then lipstick, then concealer. Sunscreen fared poorly with both groups. (The mascara priority may be the only thing I have in common with French women.)

Of course you should take these survey results with a grain of salt. The respondents were probably lying.