Project Runway Gets Slapped With Another Law Suit

Project Runway is no stranger to legal woes. How could anyone forget the epic legal battle between Bravo and Lifetime for the hit show that held up production for months? Now the show is facing another suit, albeit a much smaller one. Missouri-based photographer Marcie Cobbaert is claiming that Project Runway used her photos and stuck a Lifetime watermark on it, WWD is reporting. Cobbaert has filed suit against the show for copyright infringement, alleging that the photos she took of contestant Laura Kathleen Planck were used without her permission despite letters she sent in May and June stating her objections.
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Project Runway is no stranger to legal woes. How could anyone forget the epic legal battle between Bravo and Lifetime for the hit show that held up production for months? Now the show is facing another suit, albeit a much smaller one. Missouri-based photographer Marcie Cobbaert is claiming that Project Runway used her photos and stuck a Lifetime watermark on it, WWD is reporting. Cobbaert has filed suit against the show for copyright infringement, alleging that the photos she took of contestant Laura Kathleen Planck were used without her permission despite letters she sent in May and June stating her objections.
Photo: Lifetime

Photo: Lifetime

Project Runway is no stranger to legal woes. How could anyone forget the epic legal battle between Bravo and Lifetime for the hit show that held up production for months?

Now the show is facing another suit, albeit a much smaller one.

Missouri-based photographer Marcie Cobbaert is claiming that Project Runway used her photos and stuck a Lifetime watermark on it, WWD is reporting. Cobbaert has filed suit against the show for copyright infringement, alleging that the photos she took of contestant Laura Kathleen Planck were used without her permission despite letters she sent in May and June stating her objections.

Cobbaert is seeking statutory damages of "no less than $750 or more than $30,000 per act of infringement, and statutory damages of no more than $150,000 per act of willful infringement," according to WWD.