Dries Van Noten Spring 2012: The Prince of Prints Mixes Photography and Couture

"Chic" is an overused word but it's an apt one to describe Dries Van Noten's spring 2012 collection. There was a calm elegance to his show, which opened with boxy separates and shift dresses that seemed early '60s and couture inspired, all of it in a soothing grey-toned palette. There were plenty of prints, of course--this is Dries after all. There was a tropical palm leaf one, an etched 17th century one, and a digital floral, and cityscapes (reinforced by a soundtrack infused with city noises) all blocked together at times on the same frocks. Color was gradually introduced but never to shock. First the palm tree prints became green, and then there were shocks of magenta which contrasted nicely with the grey. I loved the cropped jackets, especially the Spanish toreador ones, as well as the perfect printed collared button-downs.
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Leah Chernikoff
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"Chic" is an overused word but it's an apt one to describe Dries Van Noten's spring 2012 collection. There was a calm elegance to his show, which opened with boxy separates and shift dresses that seemed early '60s and couture inspired, all of it in a soothing grey-toned palette. There were plenty of prints, of course--this is Dries after all. There was a tropical palm leaf one, an etched 17th century one, and a digital floral, and cityscapes (reinforced by a soundtrack infused with city noises) all blocked together at times on the same frocks. Color was gradually introduced but never to shock. First the palm tree prints became green, and then there were shocks of magenta which contrasted nicely with the grey. I loved the cropped jackets, especially the Spanish toreador ones, as well as the perfect printed collared button-downs.
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"Chic" is an overused word but it's an apt one to describe Dries Van Noten's spring 2012 collection. There was a calm elegance to his show, which opened with boxy separates and shift dresses that seemed early '60s and couture inspired, all of it in a soothing grey-toned palette.

There were plenty of prints, of course--this is Dries after all. There was a tropical palm leaf one, an etched 17th century one, and a digital floral, and prints done from photos of cityscapes (reinforced by a soundtrack infused with city noises) all blocked together at times on the same frocks. Color was gradually introduced but never to shock. First the palm tree prints became green, and then there were shocks of magenta which contrasted nicely with the grey. I loved the cropped jackets, especially the Spanish toreador ones, as well as the perfect printed collared button-downs.

Dries Van Noten's collection is in keeping with many trends we've seen this season--the early '60s influence, floral prints, and he even got on the peplum kick, but he slapped them on the front of pants. His twists on trends are fresh, and to be redundant, wear-ably chic.

**Photos: Imaxtree