Jaeger Spring 2012: Spring into England

With more than 125 years of dressing lovely ladies in the UK, Jaeger is as British as tea and crumpets. And while their long history can read a bit stodgy, Jaeger has been on a campaign the last few years to hip it up a bit to appeal to a new generation--and, this show, with a few exceptions, is going to help that cause. It's still a bit on the conservative side, yes, but I don't really expect to see the Queen in the rainbow knee-length shorts or chic flat-brimmed Panama-esque hats any time soon. I chatted briefly with the Telegraph's Hilary Alexander before one of the morning shows, and she predicted that geometry would be an early trend in London. That lady is not a fashion legend for no reason--Jaeger opened with a series of dresses and skirts featuring triangular cut-outs and neat scalloped edges. Tiny polka dots, almost like dotted swiss, adorned suits, dresses, and skirts. Striped pieces in muted tones of mustard, orange, and blue, were the standouts here, particularly on a tidy crew neck nipped-waist dress. It got fancier with eyelet and broderie gowns, followed by sheer lace adorned with bows.
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With more than 125 years of dressing lovely ladies in the UK, Jaeger is as British as tea and crumpets. And while their long history can read a bit stodgy, Jaeger has been on a campaign the last few years to hip it up a bit to appeal to a new generation--and, this show, with a few exceptions, is going to help that cause. It's still a bit on the conservative side, yes, but I don't really expect to see the Queen in the rainbow knee-length shorts or chic flat-brimmed Panama-esque hats any time soon. I chatted briefly with the Telegraph's Hilary Alexander before one of the morning shows, and she predicted that geometry would be an early trend in London. That lady is not a fashion legend for no reason--Jaeger opened with a series of dresses and skirts featuring triangular cut-outs and neat scalloped edges. Tiny polka dots, almost like dotted swiss, adorned suits, dresses, and skirts. Striped pieces in muted tones of mustard, orange, and blue, were the standouts here, particularly on a tidy crew neck nipped-waist dress. It got fancier with eyelet and broderie gowns, followed by sheer lace adorned with bows.
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With more than 125 years of dressing lovely ladies in the UK, Jaeger is as British as tea and crumpets. And while their long history can read a bit stodgy, Jaeger has been on a campaign the last few years to hip it up a bit to appeal to a new generation--and, this show, with a few exceptions, is going to help that cause. It's still a bit on the conservative side, yes, but I don't really expect to see the Queen in the rainbow knee-length shorts or chic flat-brimmed Panama-esque hats any time soon.

I chatted briefly with the Telegraph's Hilary Alexander before one of the morning shows, and she predicted that geometry would be an early trend in London. That lady is not a fashion legend for no reason--Jaeger opened with a series of dresses and skirts featuring triangular cut-outs and neat scalloped edges. Tiny polka dots, almost like dotted swiss, adorned suits, dresses, and skirts. Striped pieces in muted tones of mustard, orange, and blue, were the standouts here, particularly on a tidy crew neck nipped-waist dress. It got fancier with eyelet and broderie gowns, followed by sheer lace adorned with bows.

I was expecting a bit of a yawn with this collection, honestly, but was pleasantly surprised by the caffeinated jolt it gave me. Newer Brit fashion tends to run towards the experimental, but Jaeger proves that you can have heritage and still dress a girl for a party.

**All photos via Imaxtree