Kevork Kiledjian Spring 2012: Leather, Lace, and Lots of Skin

Having never viewed any of French designer Kevork Kiledjian's work before, I wasn't exactly sure what to expect when I arrived at his show yesterday. In his collection notes, the designer (whose former collections include Triiad and Guilty Brotherhood) promised "an eternal palette for a new encounter" that was "the outcome of a captured evolution," statements that left guests scratching their heads from the get-go. But after the first few exits alone, it became clear that manipulating and molding leather is where this designer shines. There were impressively tailored skinny leather pants, a cool white buckled vest, and a number of tiny bustier dresses with intricately braided seams. And I liked a pink-and-olive printed chiffon that, though it at first glance appeared to be a floral design, turned out to be a pattern of snarling tigers (fierce, indeed). The problem?
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Having never viewed any of French designer Kevork Kiledjian's work before, I wasn't exactly sure what to expect when I arrived at his show yesterday. In his collection notes, the designer (whose former collections include Triiad and Guilty Brotherhood) promised "an eternal palette for a new encounter" that was "the outcome of a captured evolution," statements that left guests scratching their heads from the get-go. But after the first few exits alone, it became clear that manipulating and molding leather is where this designer shines. There were impressively tailored skinny leather pants, a cool white buckled vest, and a number of tiny bustier dresses with intricately braided seams. And I liked a pink-and-olive printed chiffon that, though it at first glance appeared to be a floral design, turned out to be a pattern of snarling tigers (fierce, indeed). The problem?
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Having never viewed any of French designer Kevork Kiledjian's work before, I wasn't exactly sure what to expect when I arrived at his show yesterday. In his collection notes, the designer (whose former collections include Triiad and Guilty Brotherhood) promised "an eternal palette for a new encounter" that was "the outcome of a captured evolution," statements that left guests scratching their heads from the get-go. But after the first few exits alone, it became clear that manipulating and molding leather is where this designer shines. There were impressively tailored skinny leather pants, a cool white buckled vest, and a number of tiny bustier dresses with intricately braided seams. And I liked a pink-and-olive printed chiffon that, though it at first glance appeared to be a floral design, turned out to be a pattern of snarling tigers (fierce, indeed).

The problem? More often than not, the looks skewed trampy. From a body-con dress with skin-baring lacing up each side to a hot pink number bearing sheer lace paneling, a cleavage cutout, and a hemline that took it into tunic territory, it was altogether too much sexiness for a single runway. Those beautifully-cut blazers and aforementioned leather looks prove that Kiledjian knows how to make good clothes--it's just a matter of tweaking that taste level. Because if a model only responsible for making it down the runway in her cocoa lamé gown can't avoid a near-wardrobe malfunction--we're talking bare butts on the catwalk, people--what chance do the rest of us stand?

**All photos: Imaxtree