Marc Jacobs Spring 2012: Ready for Dior..and All That Jazz

Even though the anticipation of waiting for Marc Jacobs nearly killed us after he postponed his show due to Hurricane Irene--it's fitting that he showed last. Because not only does Marc Jacobs consistently present one of the best and most important collections each season (in terms of setting trends), but he also really puts on a show. And last night, Jacobs literally put a show. A heavy gold curtain parted to reveal a full cast of models draped Fosse-style over wooden chairs across the length of the stage (think of the "Cell Block Tango" number from Chicago or A Chorus Line)--and you could actually hear the audience gasp ('Are they going to dance? Sing?' we hoped). Earlier that night, Jacobs' sent out an urgent email canceling all backstage beauty press due to "a very long technical rehearsal" and now we understand why. The show was intricately choreographed, with models exiting the Broadway-esque tableau at precise times to walk the stage, which was set like a dance hall in a barn--a simple wooden frame lined with bulbs bisected the runway. And in another nod to Fosse, Jacobs, clad all in black (he was even wearing jazz pants), crouched behind his models, clapping along to keep time and give his dancers models cues--and all of it to a Phillip Glass soundtrack of voices counting to eight over and over--standard for choreography. It was as if Marc was winking at us, taking the stage because he knew he was at the center of it as the name on the tip of everyone's tongue to succeed Galliano at Dior. Jacobs told WWD that taking the job at the storied French house “has nothing to do with salary. I mean, I’d be honored to do Dior. But I work with a team, and I’d like to be able to keep working with them. I think it would be really exciting. I wouldn’t be able to say no.” But we should talk about the clothes.
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Leah Chernikoff
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Even though the anticipation of waiting for Marc Jacobs nearly killed us after he postponed his show due to Hurricane Irene--it's fitting that he showed last. Because not only does Marc Jacobs consistently present one of the best and most important collections each season (in terms of setting trends), but he also really puts on a show. And last night, Jacobs literally put a show. A heavy gold curtain parted to reveal a full cast of models draped Fosse-style over wooden chairs across the length of the stage (think of the "Cell Block Tango" number from Chicago or A Chorus Line)--and you could actually hear the audience gasp ('Are they going to dance? Sing?' we hoped). Earlier that night, Jacobs' sent out an urgent email canceling all backstage beauty press due to "a very long technical rehearsal" and now we understand why. The show was intricately choreographed, with models exiting the Broadway-esque tableau at precise times to walk the stage, which was set like a dance hall in a barn--a simple wooden frame lined with bulbs bisected the runway. And in another nod to Fosse, Jacobs, clad all in black (he was even wearing jazz pants), crouched behind his models, clapping along to keep time and give his dancers models cues--and all of it to a Phillip Glass soundtrack of voices counting to eight over and over--standard for choreography. It was as if Marc was winking at us, taking the stage because he knew he was at the center of it as the name on the tip of everyone's tongue to succeed Galliano at Dior. Jacobs told WWD that taking the job at the storied French house “has nothing to do with salary. I mean, I’d be honored to do Dior. But I work with a team, and I’d like to be able to keep working with them. I think it would be really exciting. I wouldn’t be able to say no.” But we should talk about the clothes.
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Even though the anticipation of waiting for Marc Jacobs nearly killed us after he postponed his show due to Hurricane Irene--it's fitting that he showed last. Because not only does Marc Jacobs consistently present one of the best and most important collections each season (in terms of setting trends), but he also really puts on a show.

And last night, Jacobs literally put a show. A heavy gold curtain parted to reveal a full cast of models draped Fosse-style over wooden chairs across the length of the stage (think of the "Cell Block Tango" number from Chicago or A Chorus Line)--and you could actually hear the audience gasp ('Are they going to dance? Sing?' we hoped). Earlier that night, Jacobs' sent out an urgent email canceling all backstage beauty press due to "a very long technical rehearsal" and now we understand why. The show was intricately choreographed, with models exiting the Broadway-esque tableau at precise times to walk the stage, which was set like a dance hall in a barn--a simple wooden frame lined with bulbs bisected the runway. And in another nod to Fosse, Jacobs, clad all in black (he was even wearing jazz pants), crouched behind his models, clapping along to keep time and give his dancers models cues--and all of it to a Phillip Glass soundtrack of voices counting to eight over and over--standard for choreography.

It was as if Marc was winking at us, taking the stage because he knew he was at the center of it as the name on the tip of everyone's tongue to succeed Galliano at Dior. Jacobs told WWD that taking the job at the storied French house “has nothing to do with salary. I mean, I’d be honored to do Dior. But I work with a team, and I’d like to be able to keep working with them. I think it would be really exciting. I wouldn’t be able to say no.”

But we should talk about the clothes. Because they were great. In keeping with All That Jazz, the clothes had a '20s vibe (an era Ralph Lauren drew from earlier that day). Looks were drop-waisted and dresses and skirts had flapper-ish fringe, which, according to the line sheets, was made of film. While "the return of the dress" has been heralded lately, Jacobs showed mostly separates--smart, below-the-knee-length voluminous skirts done in crazy modern fabrics like silicone and cellophane (another nod to Chicago?). The makeup was muted as these models were working dancers, their hair tied up in cashmere 'do rags and "sweatband cloches." Speaking of working, there were also chambray looks to get down and dirty in and pops of gingham and plastic cowboy boots that picked up on whole barn thing.

It was the fabrics that shone--literally. Cellophane shimmered and lame and sequins sparkled. It was a collection that proved that this designer is ready to take the reigns at Dior. We can't wait to see what happens.

**All images: Imaxtree