Is Milk the Fabric of the Future? One Designer Thinks So

Young German designer Anke Domaske is mining an unusual resource when it comes to producing her clothing line Mademoiselle Chi Chi: The contents of her refrigerator--or, more specifically, milk. Domaske--who is also a former microbiology student, natch--has developed a new fabric called QMilch, which is made from high concentrations of the milk protein casein, according to Reuters. As stated in the press release, the fabric is produced thusly, "The casein is extracted from dried milk powder and then heated up in a type of meat-mincing machine with other natural ingredients. The fiber comes out in strands and is then spun into yarn on a spinning machine." We admit, our first reaction was: Ew. But actually, after reading more about it, QMilch could seriously be the fabric of the future.
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Hayley Phelan
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Young German designer Anke Domaske is mining an unusual resource when it comes to producing her clothing line Mademoiselle Chi Chi: The contents of her refrigerator--or, more specifically, milk. Domaske--who is also a former microbiology student, natch--has developed a new fabric called QMilch, which is made from high concentrations of the milk protein casein, according to Reuters. As stated in the press release, the fabric is produced thusly, "The casein is extracted from dried milk powder and then heated up in a type of meat-mincing machine with other natural ingredients. The fiber comes out in strands and is then spun into yarn on a spinning machine." We admit, our first reaction was: Ew. But actually, after reading more about it, QMilch could seriously be the fabric of the future.
Photo: Reutuers

Photo: Reutuers

Young German designer Anke Domaske is mining an unusual resource when it comes to producing her clothing line Mademoiselle Chi Chi: The contents of her refrigerator--or, more specifically, milk.

Domaske--who is also a former microbiology student, natch--has developed a new fabric called QMilch, which is made from high concentrations of the milk protein casein, according to Reuters. As stated in the press release, the fabric is produced thusly, "The casein is extracted from dried milk powder and then heated up in a type of meat-mincing machine with other natural ingredients. The fiber comes out in strands and is then spun into yarn on a spinning machine."

We admit, our first reaction was: Ew. But actually, after reading more about it, QMilch could seriously be the fabric of the future. It's all natural, ecologically friendly and is apparently the "first man-made fiber produced entirely without chemicals." It has no smell, you can throw it in the wash like normal and, according to Domaske, "It feels like silk."

What's more, QMilch has a slew of health benefits. The designer told Reuters that "amino acids in the protein are antibacterial, anti-aging and can help regulate both blood circulation and body temperature." Sounds pretty great.

So there you have it: You may soon be pouring that morning latte into your wardrobe, instead of your mouth!