Daphne Guinness Hates Blue Jeans, Thinks Fashion is 'Feeding on a Sort of Cadaver'

Daphne Guinness is one of the industry's favorite eccentrics, known for sporting towering heel-less platforms and skunk hair way before Gaga, and a wardrobe so outrageous it earned its own FIT exhibit. Though her status means she can drop millions on McQueen or use the windows of Barneys as a dressing room, the heiress is actually a little shy. In an unusual burst of publicity, the internet popped out three interviews with Guinness today, including photos of her topless in Interview magazine. Click through to see which items have given her buyers' remorse, the hazards of trying to be ironic in print, and how current fashion is "feeding on a cadaver:"
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Daphne Guinness is one of the industry's favorite eccentrics, known for sporting towering heel-less platforms and skunk hair way before Gaga, and a wardrobe so outrageous it earned its own FIT exhibit. Though her status means she can drop millions on McQueen or use the windows of Barneys as a dressing room, the heiress is actually a little shy. In an unusual burst of publicity, the internet popped out three interviews with Guinness today, including photos of her topless in Interview magazine. Click through to see which items have given her buyers' remorse, the hazards of trying to be ironic in print, and how current fashion is "feeding on a cadaver:"
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On fashion trends and history

Fashion is not just about trends. It’s about political history. You can trace it from the ancient Romans to probably until the ’80s, and you can see defining moments that were due either to revolutions or changes in politics... But now we’ve been feeding on a sort of cadaver. At the moment, we’re just endlessly recycling the past.

On fashion today

How do you think the last 10 years will be defined? I can’t think of how...There hasn’t been anything real since grunge. That was the last movement led by music or an art form.

From her NPR profile About the reasoning behind her FIT exhibit

I don't tell anybody else what to wear. I would never dream of it. I want [the next generation of designers] not to have to feel that they have to wear this or that in order to be accepted or acceptable.

On growing up as a Guinness

I've always been more slight and I've always sort of felt that I needed to be protected, especially with so many rowdy brothers and sisters," she says. "I always wanted to be sort of a knight of the Round Table; it sort of appealed to the idea of [Sir] Gawain and the Green Knight.

Photos: Interview