This Year in Vogue: An Analysis of all the Covers from 2011

Gisele Bundchen, the modelling equivalent of the Energizer bunny, graced a total of eight Vogue covers this year, more than any other model or celebrity. It was a close race, but Gisele managed to nab the top spot with highlights that include Emmanelle Alt's first official issue of Vogue Paris, a delightfully tacky December cover of Vogue UK, and a July issue of Vogue Brazil dedicated solely to her. Not bad. Conde Nast has obviously been taking full advantage of the "Gisele Bundchen Stock Index." Eighteen editions of Vogue (up to nineteen with the release Vogue Netherlands next year, yay!) producing, on average, 12 covers a month certainly gives us a lot to play around with. With all the importance placed on a cover--the selling point of a magazine--we wanted to see what Vogues worldwide deemed best to put on the front of their glossies, so we went ahead and crunched the numbers. Above is our little mock-up to represent 2011. Perhaps it's a little flashier (okay, tackier) than most magazines you'll see on a newsstand, but we feel it's an accurate representation of the year. To make a little more sense out of it, click through to find out specifics of the who, the what, and the wear.
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Gisele Bundchen, the modelling equivalent of the Energizer bunny, graced a total of eight Vogue covers this year, more than any other model or celebrity. It was a close race, but Gisele managed to nab the top spot with highlights that include Emmanelle Alt's first official issue of Vogue Paris, a delightfully tacky December cover of Vogue UK, and a July issue of Vogue Brazil dedicated solely to her. Not bad. Conde Nast has obviously been taking full advantage of the "Gisele Bundchen Stock Index." Eighteen editions of Vogue (up to nineteen with the release Vogue Netherlands next year, yay!) producing, on average, 12 covers a month certainly gives us a lot to play around with. With all the importance placed on a cover--the selling point of a magazine--we wanted to see what Vogues worldwide deemed best to put on the front of their glossies, so we went ahead and crunched the numbers. Above is our little mock-up to represent 2011. Perhaps it's a little flashier (okay, tackier) than most magazines you'll see on a newsstand, but we feel it's an accurate representation of the year. To make a little more sense out of it, click through to find out specifics of the who, the what, and the wear.
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Gisele Bundchen, the modelling equivalent of the Energizer bunny, graced a total of eight Vogue covers this year, more than any other model or celebrity. It was a close race, but Gisele managed to nab the top spot with highlights that include

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Most Popular Cover Photographer: Mario Testino The man who ruled

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Models vs. Celebs For all the model lovers out there worried about celebrities ruling the fashion magazine cover, relax! 70% of the cover ladies (and a few gents) this year were models, while only 30% were celebrities. All hope is not lost.

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Most Popular Cover Designer: Gucci Two bold collections (and a pretty good PR team) in 2011 made sure that Gucci saw the most covers of Vogue this year. The strong jeweled tones of Gucci's spring and fall frocks were perfect, eye-catching choices though, so we can't complain.

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The Age of Vogue

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Cover Subject Nationality Refer to this lovely map of the world and you will notice the native countries of Vogue cover subjects, and their frequency. The darker the country, the more cover subjects hailed from there. The United States ultimately ran away with this particular race. You'll notice that the UK and Brazil trailed behind in second and third, respectively.

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Cover Diversity In 2011, 22% of Vogue cover subjects were non-white. The kicker? The majority of that percentage is made up from editions which predominantly feature that country's native models/celebrities, like China, Taiwan and India. In fact, about half of Vogue's 18 editions failed to feature any non-white cover subjects at all. Let's hope next year finds itself a little more diverse.