Third Time's a Charm: Vogue Italia Takes to the Runway for the Third Year in a Row--This Time With a Nod to QVC

Steven Meisel is known to have his tongue placed firmly in cheek when it comes to his fashion photography. This particular brand of humor is one of
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Steven Meisel is known to have his tongue placed firmly in cheek when it comes to his fashion photography. This particular brand of humor is one of
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Steven Meisel is known to have his tongue placed firmly in cheek when it comes to his fashion photography. This particular brand of humor is one of his trademarks, and necessary for an industry that has a reputation for sometimes taking itself a little too seriously. Case in point: his most recent Vogue Italia cover. For the third year in a row, Meisel takes to the runway for the January edition of the magazine, only this year takes a turn more towards QVC than high fashion (though model Daria Strokous is showing off a spring Chanel frock).

2010's January cover saw Karlie Kloss losing her footing on a runway while the editorial highlighted dramatic backstage antics of high fashion shows. Last year was a nostalgic look back to the more intimate and subdued couture shows of the fifties. Arizona Muse and Freja Beha Erichsen were covers girl then, both in Chanel.

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This year, Meisel is working with recent muse Daria Strokous (whom he recently shot for Louis Vuitton's sugary-sweet spring campaign) and Caroline Trentini for a cover which recalls the bank account dangers of lazy Saturday afternoon channel surfing.

The cover and accompanying editorial (to be released in Milan tomorrow) are meant to be "an artistically ironic simulation of telesales programs, nowadays much in vogue in the United States," according to Vogue Italia's website, "where cult garments and must-have accessories, from purses to shoes, to the most sophisticated jewelry, are presented by It-girls and chic ladies." But it's not real, ok? "Warning! All prices, telephone numbers, deadlines, that is to say all the writings superimposed onto the images are invented and have no reference to reality," the site ads. "It is only a game."

We can't wait to see what's inside.