Watch: Hilarious Spoof Commercial for New Beauty Product 'Fotoshop by Adobé'

Fotoshop by Adobé from Jesse Rosten on Vimeo. This faux commercial, written and directed by Jesse Rosten, introduces "the next revolution in beauty"--
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Hayley Phelan
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Fotoshop by Adobé from Jesse Rosten on Vimeo. This faux commercial, written and directed by Jesse Rosten, introduces "the next revolution in beauty"--

Fotoshop by Adobé from Jesse Rosten on Vimeo.

This faux commercial, written and directed by Jesse Rosten, introduces "the next revolution in beauty"--a product that promises to give you "full lips, sparkling eyes, and lashes that never end," as well as pore-less skin, and a banging new bikini bod. The name of this ingenious new beauty product? You guessed it: Photoshop. Or, as Rosten cleverly calls it, Fotoshop by Adobé. From "simply erasing" blemishes with the product's "pro-pixel intensifying fauxtanical hydro-jargon microbead extract" to changing hair, eye color and even "adjusting your race" with the "breakthrough" hue/saturation technology, there's pretty much nothing this miraculous product can't do.

But here's the scary part: Besides the fact that it's for a fake product, Rosten's video completely nails the tone and format of the average beauty commercial. There are before and after comparisons, animated illustrations of pores being filled in by "micro-beads," and spliced together images of women smiling, swishing their hair and boxing--"Want to be a total knockout?" Then there's the peppy female narrator, who says things like "revolutionary technology," and "breakthrough system,"--buzzwords that have become de rigeur in nearly every beauty commercial--as well as asks questions like, "Why eat healthy and exercise when you can just look like you do?"

Of course that's exactly the point and this faux ad draws attention to a very real problem: The use of photoshop in cosmetic ads can be extremely misleading to consumers--a problem that the U.S. has recently taken steps to combat.

Rosten, who says of the video, "This commercial isn't real, neither are society's standards of beauty," is certainly doing his part to keep that conversation going.