Patrik Ervell Fall 2012: Police State

When downtown mainstay and minimalist du jour Patrik Ervell conceptualized his Fall 2012 men's and women's collection, he turned to a dark, aggressive –and depending on which political circle you swing in, somewhat controversial – reference. “I was thinking, ‘What does authority look like to people today?'” the young Scandinavian-born sportswear designer explained to us backstage. The answer was, “Navy, nylon and uniforms—the police aesthetic,” which he presented in lean and militaristic form.
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When downtown mainstay and minimalist du jour Patrik Ervell conceptualized his Fall 2012 men's and women's collection, he turned to a dark, aggressive –and depending on which political circle you swing in, somewhat controversial – reference. “I was thinking, ‘What does authority look like to people today?'” the young Scandinavian-born sportswear designer explained to us backstage. The answer was, “Navy, nylon and uniforms—the police aesthetic,” which he presented in lean and militaristic form.
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When downtown mainstay and minimalist du jour Patrik Ervell conceptualized his Fall 2012 men's and women's collection, he turned to a dark, aggressive –and depending on which political circle you swing in, somewhat controversial – reference. “I was thinking, ‘What does authority look like to people today?'” the young Scandinavian-born sportswear designer explained to us backstage. The answer was, “Navy, nylon and uniforms—the police aesthetic,” which he presented in lean and militaristic form.

Ervell’s friends and supporters – Terrence Koh (front and center in his usual – though today extra feathery – all white ensemble) and Ryan McGinley, among others– came out in force to Milk Studios. A jarring, industrial soundtrack set the mood for the procession of slim-legged, dark suited men and jumpsuit-fitted women.

Lest you think that Ervell’s latest collection carries a particularly hard edge, it should be noted that his trademark boyish touches (black pleather backpacks; baseball caps for girls) remain intact. There's also a hint of subversiveness. “When you reference something like the police, you also kind of disarm it in a way, you know?” comments Ervell, who splattered paint on the fabric for many of his pieces in a warehouse in Brooklyn. “And [the reference] is mixed with things that are the opposite – painted silk, a little gold.”

Photos: IMAXtree