The Movies Inspiring Fashion Now

The relationship between fashion and film is a bit incestuous. Fashion on the red carpet is always (always) a hot topic, actors are not only starring in campaigns (has anyone seen Edward Norton for Prada yet?) but walking down the runways--and then, of course, there's the fashion that actually appears in films. So we are less than shocked when designers are inspired by Hollywood (or vice versa). To wit, the roaring 20s were paraded down more than a few catwalks during the spring 2012 shows, and even a few pre-fall outings, proving that this inspirational era was not just an isolated incident. While this may disappoint some critics, the style remains, and it does raise the question--did the releases (looming or otherwise) of period pieces like W.E. and The Great Gatsby inspire this turn towards the flapper, or would designers have found themselves inspired by the decade anyway? To be honest, the question hardly seems the point considering how fashion and film are practically bed buddies. The jazz age isn't the only recent evidence of this symbiotic relationship. Consider The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, or even My Week With Marilyn. Or just let us. With the Oscars upon us tonight, we thought it was a good time to look back and the films inspiring fashion now.
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The relationship between fashion and film is a bit incestuous. Fashion on the red carpet is always (always) a hot topic, actors are not only starring in campaigns (has anyone seen Edward Norton for Prada yet?) but walking down the runways--and then, of course, there's the fashion that actually appears in films. So we are less than shocked when designers are inspired by Hollywood (or vice versa). To wit, the roaring 20s were paraded down more than a few catwalks during the spring 2012 shows, and even a few pre-fall outings, proving that this inspirational era was not just an isolated incident. While this may disappoint some critics, the style remains, and it does raise the question--did the releases (looming or otherwise) of period pieces like W.E. and The Great Gatsby inspire this turn towards the flapper, or would designers have found themselves inspired by the decade anyway? To be honest, the question hardly seems the point considering how fashion and film are practically bed buddies. The jazz age isn't the only recent evidence of this symbiotic relationship. Consider The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, or even My Week With Marilyn. Or just let us. With the Oscars upon us tonight, we thought it was a good time to look back and the films inspiring fashion now.

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The relationship between fashion and film is a bit incestuous. Fashion on the red carpet is always (always) a hot topic, actors are not only starring in campaigns (has anyone seen Edward Norton for Prada yet?) but walking down the runways--and then, of course, there's the fashion that actually appears in films. So we are less than shocked when designers are inspired by Hollywood (or vice versa).

To wit, the roaring 20s were paraded down more than a few catwalks during the spring 2012 shows, and even a few pre-fall outings, proving that this inspirational era was not just an isolated incident. While this may disappoint some critics, the style remains, and it does raise the question--did the releases (looming or otherwise) of period pieces like W.E. and The Great Gatsby inspire this turn towards the flapper, or would designers have found themselves inspired by the decade anyway? To be honest, the question hardly seems the point considering how fashion and film are practically bed buddies.

The jazz age isn't the only recent evidence of this symbiotic relationship. Consider The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, or even My Week With Marilyn. Or just let us. With the Oscars upon us tonight, we thought it was a good time to look back and the films inspiring fashion now.

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Do we think author Stieg Larrson expected his heroine, Lisbeth Salander, to become a style icon? Um, no. Probably not.

Months before the release of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, Rooney Mara appeared on the cover of W magazine in all her abrasive, bloody, confrontational glory. That was back in July, and the hype machine has been working hard ever since to not only promote the film, but promote a red carpet existence for Mara where reality meets fiction. Mara has been so deliberately styled these past few months to emulate Lisbeth--or at least her darker side--that it's tough to know where the actress begins and the character ends. In her November Vogue interview, she claimed that "before, I dressed much girlier," so it looks like, along with the rest of the world, she's been bitten by the dragon (tattoo).

Trish Summerville, costume director of the American version of the film, designed a 30 piece collection for Swedish retailer H&M late last year. Meanwhile, Riccardo Tisci's recent haute couture outing for Givenchy looks to be made for Rooney (or should we say Lisbeth?), and we definitely expect her to show up at the Oscars in one of those dresses (nose ring optional). And was it just us, or did every model at Versace look a little like Lisbeth? There are two more films still to be released in the series, and the dark, monotone color palette with a penchant for leather is something we've seen a lot in the styles of models off duty, and as a result we anticipate the influence from this film has long limbs and tons of stamina.

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Like we said, pastels, art deco, ostrich plumes, and drop waists were not reserved just for the spring shows last September, as you may have noticed that they spilled over into pre-fall these past few months. The veritable army of flappers marching down runways reminded anyone who keeps up with Hollywood of the much-hyped adaptation (yes, another) of book list favorite, The Great Gatsby. The WASPy dream of pale colors and decadence makes for lovely runway fodder but more importantly, it's such an easy trend to apply in real life. It certainly fell in line with the general girly feel of spring 2012 and all those frothy covers we've been seeing because of it.

Don't expect to see the film, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Carey Mulligan, and Tobey Maguire to be released until late this year, though. Perhaps the 30s vibe will continue until then for the red carpet, whether Cathy Horyn likes it or not.

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"You can never be too rich or too thin" is one of Wallis Simpson's most famous quotes. Can you see why she might be considered a(n infamously snide) fashion icon? Madonna's film of the famous Duke and Duchess of Windsor, W.E., debuted to some dubious reviews last year, but the film was certainly good for one thing: fashion. At least that's what the AMPAS seems to think considering Arianne Phillips received an Oscar nomination in the Best Costume category for her work on the film.

Pre-fall included a few designers who cited the Duchess as inspiriation, among them Peter Som and Temperley London. Not only topical as a result of Madonna's film, but her impeccable style and hipless figure do bear a resemblance to another famous lady with royal lineage.

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Although Marilyn may not have had as strong a presence on the runways during the spring shows, she certainly has shown up in spades elsewhere. Many incarnations of the icon (played by Michelle Williams who starred in last year's My Week with Marilyn) have been gracing the pages, not to mention covers, of magazines on an endless loop. You couldn't have missed Williams' latest sultry GQ cover, we're sure.

Marilyn Monroe may be amongst the most overused icons in fashion, but don’t think that deters anyone from continuing to use the imagery when in need of a little bit of glamour. She has been a source of endless inspiration for designers, and we doubt that's about to change.