Gwyneth Paltrow to the New York Times: I Wrote My Cookbook Myself!

Gwyneth Paltrow wants everyone to know that she wrote My Father's Daughter, her debut cook book, herself. In her first tweet since her Oscars Tom Ford debut, Paltrow wrote "Love @nytimes dining section but this weeks facts need checking. No ghost writer on my cookbook, I wrote every word myself." Her defensive tweet was in response to a New York Times article by Julia Moskin, which says celebrities are able to churn out lots of cook books because they aren't actually writing them. She gives Gwyneth Paltrow as an example and says Paltrow's ghostwriter is Julia Turshen, who she mentions is currently working on a second book with the actress. So what exactly did Turshen do? Gwyneth sort of explains that in the book with the following author's note:
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Gwyneth Paltrow wants everyone to know that she wrote My Father's Daughter, her debut cook book, herself. In her first tweet since her Oscars Tom Ford debut, Paltrow wrote "Love @nytimes dining section but this weeks facts need checking. No ghost writer on my cookbook, I wrote every word myself." Her defensive tweet was in response to a New York Times article by Julia Moskin, which says celebrities are able to churn out lots of cook books because they aren't actually writing them. She gives Gwyneth Paltrow as an example and says Paltrow's ghostwriter is Julia Turshen, who she mentions is currently working on a second book with the actress. So what exactly did Turshen do? Gwyneth sort of explains that in the book with the following author's note:
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Gwyneth Paltrow wants everyone to know that she wrote My Father's Daughter, her debut cook book, herself. In her first tweet since her Oscars Tom Ford debut, Paltrow wrote "Love @nytimes dining section but this weeks facts need checking. No ghost writer on my cookbook, I wrote every word myself."

Her defensive tweet was in response to a New York Times article by Julia Moskin, which says celebrities are able to churn out lots of cook books because they aren't actually writing them. She gives Gwyneth Paltrow as an example and says Paltrow's ghostwriter is Julia Turshen, who she mentions is currently working on a second book with the actress. So what exactly did Turshen do? Gwyneth sort of explains that in the book with the following author's note:

I literally could not have written this book without the tireless, artful assistance of Julia Turshen, who stood over my shoulder at the stove and chopping block for the better part of a year, bringing a method to my freestyle madness. She quantified, tested and retested every recipe, oversaw the production of the photos, helped brainstorm in a crisis, and, above all, was my intellectual and emotional support through the whole process.

Sounds like she did a lot, but did she write it? Gwynnie has been dishing out fashion and lifestyle advice in her newsletter GOOP for years and we're pretty sure she actually writes that (or at least most of it), and her book had an earnest tone and the subject was very personal. She clearly had some assistance and probably had an editor, but not necessarily a ghostwriter.

Who do you believe: Paltrow or the Times?