Roberto Cavalli Thinks Anna Wintour 'Wants All Women to Be Like Her' and that American Fashion is 'Terrible'

Roberto Cavalli, never afraid to share what's on his mind, has some strong opinions about American fashion and its dictator, Anna Wintour. In an interview with Italian art and design site D. La Reppublica, Cavalli was asked what advice he would want to pass on to young people. He then explained how he comes from a humble family and stuttered until he was 18 years old and did horribly in school. So, he created a job for himself because he believed in himself and really wanted to buy a Fiat 500. His advice to young people, from what we can gather, is not to go to design school:
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Roberto Cavalli, never afraid to share what's on his mind, has some strong opinions about American fashion and its dictator, Anna Wintour. In an interview with Italian art and design site D. La Reppublica, Cavalli was asked what advice he would want to pass on to young people. He then explained how he comes from a humble family and stuttered until he was 18 years old and did horribly in school. So, he created a job for himself because he believed in himself and really wanted to buy a Fiat 500. His advice to young people, from what we can gather, is not to go to design school:
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Roberto Cavalli, never afraid to share what's on his mind, has some strong opinions about American fashion and its dictator, Anna Wintour. In an interview with Italian art and design site D. La Reppublica, Cavalli was asked what advice he would want to pass on to young people. He then explained how he comes from a humble family and stuttered until he was 18 years old and did horribly in school. So, he created a job for himself because he believed in himself and really wanted to buy a Fiat 500. His advice to young people, from what we can gather, is not to go to design school:

I see young people coming out of design schools and they are too minimalist, probably because their professors are too minimalist, because they have professors who follow styles of design that are too industrial and commercial.

It's a decent point--a lot of fashion design schools probably do prepare their students by teaching them to make clothes people would want to wear and buy. How dare they! According to Cavalli, they shouldn't worry about that:

Try to be different and try to create artistic fashion styles, then it can be transformed, changed, modified to take into account wearability and the possibility of actually being worn.

He also says American fashion isn't actually fashion--but almost. It's basically just what Anna Wintour wants everyone to wear:

Just look at American fashion which is almost fashion. It's terrible and you almost can't even look at it, but it has been driven by a great journalist, Anna Wintour, who wants all women to be like her and to dress the way she does.

A little extreme, maybe. And maybe a little risky if he still wants Vogue to shoot his clothes and be able to afford more Fiats. But, again, he may have a point.