Facebook Meets Fashion: New Retail Initiative Displays Real Time Facebook Likes on Clothes Hangers

Many of us rely (at least partially) on our fashionable friends' opinions of potential purchases when we're shopping. But what if you find yourself on a solo spree? Sure, there are tons of fashion apps that let you share sartorial snaps for your biddies to rate, but many stores don't allow photography. For all of you rule-abiding, approval-seeking customers, one store may have a solution you'll 'Like.'
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Nora Crotty
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Many of us rely (at least partially) on our fashionable friends' opinions of potential purchases when we're shopping. But what if you find yourself on a solo spree? Sure, there are tons of fashion apps that let you share sartorial snaps for your biddies to rate, but many stores don't allow photography. For all of you rule-abiding, approval-seeking customers, one store may have a solution you'll 'Like.'
Photo: Mashable

Photo: Mashable

Many of us rely (at least partially) on our fashionable friends' opinions of potential purchases when we're shopping. But what if you find yourself on a solo spree? Sure, there are tons of fashion apps that let you share sartorial snaps for your biddies to rate, but many stores don't allow photography. For all of you rule-abiding, approval-seeking customers, one store may have a solution you'll 'Like.'

As reported by Mashable, Brazilian retailer C&A has started a new marketing initiative called FashionLike, and it goes like this: Physical wooden hangers in the store are embedded with digital counters, which are automatically updated in real-time each time a Facebook user 'Likes' the individual piece of clothing on C&A's fanpage. It's kind of like combining the fun of fashion with the freakiness of the future and the very best aspect of Skip-It (the counter, duh).

Of course, the new technology comes with its own set of questions: What if the hangers accidentally get swapped? Or even worse, are purposely switched by some maniacal sartorial saboteur? And anyway, who's really trusting the opinions of a zillion Facebook users? Personally, I wouldn't even want style advice from 90% of my Facebook 'friends,' let alone the entirety of the Facebook universe. Even Mark Zuckerberg wears a hoodie every day.

Regardless of potential kinks, FashionLike is definitely an interesting concept that explores a whole new side of the growing relationship between fashion and technology. Would you be more or less likely to purchase clothing based on how well it's liked (literally) on Facebook?