Alexander Wang Files Official Denial of Sweatshop Allegations

It's been a while since we heard about the Alexander Wang sweatshop allegations, but they haven't gone away. This week Alexander Wang Inc. officially filed a denial in court, WWD is reporting. The denial rebuts the claims of former employees Wenyu Lu and Flo Durante, who filed class-action lawsuits against the designer alleging that they had to work up to 16-hour days in an unventilated room. A little refresher:
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It's been a while since we heard about the Alexander Wang sweatshop allegations, but they haven't gone away. This week Alexander Wang Inc. officially filed a denial in court, WWD is reporting. The denial rebuts the claims of former employees Wenyu Lu and Flo Durante, who filed class-action lawsuits against the designer alleging that they had to work up to 16-hour days in an unventilated room. A little refresher:
Photo: Getty

Photo: Getty

It's been a while since we heard about the Alexander Wang sweatshop allegations, but they haven't gone away.

This week Alexander Wang Inc. officially filed a denial in court, WWD is reporting. The denial rebuts the claims of former employees Wenyu Lu and Flo Durante, who filed class-action lawsuits against the designer alleging that they had to work up to 16-hour days in an unventilated room.

A little refresher: Back in March, former employees filed a lawsuit against Wang's company to the tune of $450 million, alleging that they were forced to work under sweatshop-like conditions and put in overtime hours without compensation. Wang's flagship store in NYC subsequently got egged, and Wang eventually issued a statement that all the allegations were false.

Wang's official denial states that his company "complied with all applicable wage and hour and leave laws, and there is no basis whatsoever for plaintiffs’ frivolous and entirely unsupportable accusations that defendants have harassed them or discriminated against them on the basis of their race, or on any other protected basis." Court documents filed by Wang's camp go on to state that the defendants are "two disgruntled former employees with axes to grind" whose goal is to "exact a substantial settlement from the defendants, and that the two have mischaracterized their former workplace as a hovel, while attempting to portray defendants as ‘sweatshop owners.’” Wang claims that the studio is large and brightly lit, and that the two defendants were paid $22 and $25 per hour respectively, and were given breaks, paid vacation, paid sick days, insurance, and benefits.

It's unclear whether or not this case is going to proceed in court, but Wang definitely seems like he isn't backing down without a fight.