Neon Spring 2013: An Afternoon Picnic With Some Very Special Prints

SAO PAULO--Neon designers Dudu Bertholini and Rita Comparato are known in Brazil for their original prints and eccentricity. Both were heavily on display yesterday afternoon at Ibirabuara Park (Sao Paulo's Central Park) outside the fashion week venue. "I think this collection really translates what Neon is because our trademark is our exclusive prints," Comparato told us before the show. There were some outlandish looks--a swimsuit bottom with suspenders for instance. But there were also some awesomely wearable looks, like cute short suits and skirts for those willing to experiment with some very unusual prints. Prints that don't look like what you might find on a Prabal Gurung or a Peter Pilotto, but rather prints that look like they're indigenous to an exotic country, created by local artists. Which, these are. The designers invite over 50 artists to collaborate with them on the prints and everything is made in Brazil. While that makes production more difficult and expensive, the finished result is unlike anything you'd find in the states (unless you count the brand's recent Macy's collaboration--part of the retailer's "Magical journey through Brazil" campaign).
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SAO PAULO--Neon designers Dudu Bertholini and Rita Comparato are known in Brazil for their original prints and eccentricity. Both were heavily on display yesterday afternoon at Ibirabuara Park (Sao Paulo's Central Park) outside the fashion week venue. "I think this collection really translates what Neon is because our trademark is our exclusive prints," Comparato told us before the show. There were some outlandish looks--a swimsuit bottom with suspenders for instance. But there were also some awesomely wearable looks, like cute short suits and skirts for those willing to experiment with some very unusual prints. Prints that don't look like what you might find on a Prabal Gurung or a Peter Pilotto, but rather prints that look like they're indigenous to an exotic country, created by local artists. Which, these are. The designers invite over 50 artists to collaborate with them on the prints and everything is made in Brazil. While that makes production more difficult and expensive, the finished result is unlike anything you'd find in the states (unless you count the brand's recent Macy's collaboration--part of the retailer's "Magical journey through Brazil" campaign).
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SAO PAULO--Neon designers Dudu Bertholini and Rita Comparato are known in Brazil for their original prints and eccentricity. Both were heavily on display yesterday afternoon at Ibirabuara Park (Sao Paulo's Central Park) outside the fashion week venue. "I think this collection really translates what Neon is because our trademark is our exclusive prints," Comparato told us before the show.

There were some outlandish looks--a swimsuit bottom with suspenders for instance. But there were also some awesomely wearable looks, like cute short suits and skirts for those willing to experiment with some very unusual prints. Prints that don't look like what you might find on a Prabal Gurung or a Peter Pilotto, but rather prints that look like they're indigenous to an exotic country, created by local artists. Which is exactly the case.

The designers invite over 50 artists to collaborate with them on the prints and everything is made in Brazil. While that makes production more difficult and expensive, the finished result is unlike anything you'd find in the states (unless you count the brand's recent Macy's collaboration--part of the retailer's "Magical journey through Brazil" campaign).

Backstage before the show, makeup artist Lau Neves, who has been working with Comparato for the past 10 years, told us that it's "very Brazilian" to play with color, but to attempt the look he did for this particular show, one would need to be very careful. "You don't want to look like a bird." Neves use MAC products to create the look, which involved bright colors like yellow or peach on the eyes (each model had a different color to match her outfit) and a shiny, bold lip (also different for each model).

"I think the neon woman--she is exhuberant and strong, she has a sense of humor and doesn’t take herself too seriously," Comparato explained. While she would definitely need a good dose of confidence to pull off these full looks at an "afternoon picnic," as Comparato suggests, we think bits and pieces could fit into anyone's wardrobe. Click through to see what we mean.

Photos via FFW