Some Surprising Things We Learned from Barneys' Beauty Gurus

Barneys New York held their annual Beauty Breakfast last week in partnership with Harper’s Bazaar to celebrate some of the cosmetic industry’s rising talents. Bazaar's EIC Glenda Bailey, Simon Doonan and a slew of beauty industry stars set their alarms early to head to the Barneys flagship to hash out beauty routines, skin care regimens and give advice to the beauty editors eagerly gathered. Despite the presence of the effervescent and always entertaining Simon Doonan, the beauty gurus who sat on the panel discussion with Bazaar’s beauty director, Alexandra Parnass, were the real stars.
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Barneys New York held their annual Beauty Breakfast last week in partnership with Harper’s Bazaar to celebrate some of the cosmetic industry’s rising talents. Bazaar's EIC Glenda Bailey, Simon Doonan and a slew of beauty industry stars set their alarms early to head to the Barneys flagship to hash out beauty routines, skin care regimens and give advice to the beauty editors eagerly gathered. Despite the presence of the effervescent and always entertaining Simon Doonan, the beauty gurus who sat on the panel discussion with Bazaar’s beauty director, Alexandra Parnass, were the real stars.
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Barneys New York held their annual Beauty Breakfast last week in partnership with Harper’s Bazaar to celebrate some of the cosmetic industry’s rising talents. Bazaar's EIC Glenda Bailey, Simon Doonan and a slew of beauty industry stars set their alarms early to head to the Barneys flagship to hash out beauty routines, skin care regimens and give advice to the beauty editors eagerly gathered.

Despite the presence of the effervescent and always entertaining Simon Doonan, the beauty gurus who sat on the panel discussion with Bazaar’s beauty director, Alexandra Parnass, were the real stars. Including Carlos Huber of Arquiste perfumes, Jason Ascher (Barneys' in-house beauty consultant), Radical skincare, and Sunday Riley—the group debated about what it means to maintain a good skincare regimen and at what age it’s necessary to start using anti-aging products. To be honest, there wasn’t a woman who was not anxious about their face’s future following the conversation—this 22-year-old included (Riley advised woman to start an anti-aging regimen at 21—don’t worry though, I already have a plan in place).

The breakfast was followed by a meet-and-greet in the store’s downstairs beauty department—a place where all of those anxieties came out in full-force as the panelists were bombarded with questions about personal maintenance.

Glenda Bailey, who has surely seen her share of products come and go, offered a timeless beauty tip: “My favorite one is to smile, it takes years off of your face—it’s wonderful!” Bailey told us.

We then stopped to chat about skincare and cellulite with Sunday Riley, who was fresh off a busy week working on the makeup looks for both Stella McCartney and Acne’s resort collections. We asked Riley why she thinks fashion people are so obsessed with her products. “I think specifically with fashion people, I’m one of them—I really care about designers and what they’re doing," she said. "And I also think that makeup has to follow the same aesthetic, it has to be cutting edge and on-trend.”

One of the strangest things we learned came courtesy of Arquiste perfumer, Carlos Huber, who explained to us how body chemistry truly affects a fragrance’s final result, a fact that even extends to one’s hair color. “When we work on development we always test it on a blonde and a brunette. For example with a blonde, citruses and florals tend to be more high-pitched; it’s going to be more zingy," he said. "On a brunette, the scent turns out a little more velvety.” Fascinating. [Ed. Note: What about those of us who may get a little, um, help in the hair color department?]

Anyway, it was worth getting up early--dark under-eye circles be damned--to chat with the masters.