10 People We Think Vanity Fair Missed With Its Best Dressed List

Yesterday, Vanity Fair unveiled its yearly International Best Dressed List, one of the industry's oldest and most respected. As usual, there were some
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Dhani Mau
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Yesterday, Vanity Fair unveiled its yearly International Best Dressed List, one of the industry's oldest and most respected. As usual, there were some
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Yesterday, Vanity Fair unveiled its yearly International Best Dressed List, one of the industry's oldest and most respected. As usual, there were some choices we agreed with, some we didn't, and some people whose absence from the list was hard to understand. Morley Safer over Emma Stone (or anyone over Emma Stone)? We'll be scratching our heads over that one for a while.

Some people we're totally on board with: Diane Kruger (duh), Bill Cunningham, Lea Seydoux, Jay-Z, Colin & Livia Firth as a couple, Farida Khelfa, and even Michelle Harper. We won't say which celebs we think shouldn't have been on the list, but you can probably guess.

Here are some reasons we think the results went the way they did:

Their royalty quota: Because it's Vanity Fair, there just has to be some royalty. There is every year, and while we're all for representing various nationalities, VF's picks seem a little arbitrary at times. This year, it was Kate Middleton (who has been on the list twice before this), Prince Harry, Princess Mary of Denmark, Charlotte Casiraghi, Sheikha Moza Bint Nasser of Qatar, and Prince Heinrich Von Und Zu Furstenberg.

Men: VF seems to try--maybe too hard--to include a good balance of men. The thing is--men are generally either well-dressed or terribly-dressed. So picking five or so good ones is inevitably going to be a bit arbitrary or end up being based on something other than how good they look in a Tom Ford or Burberry suit.

Relevance: Farida Khelfa, Kate Middleton, Eddie Redmayne, and Jessica Chastain are a few people who definitely look great, but probably wouldn't be on this list if they weren't in the midst of some huge publicity driver like the revival of a famous fashion house or a big ad campaign or, you know, being married to Prince William.

Back in 2010, we got a peek at the ballot Vanity Fair uses to curate the annual best dressed list and learned a little bit about how the list gets made. For each ballot, Vanity Fair assembles a number of "suggestions for consideration;" though voters are welcome to write their own nominations in. The voters are “an international committee of fashion authorities,” which, for whatever reason, does not include us.

If it did though, click through for some of the people we would have chosen to round out their list.