Giorgio Armani Says He Sacrificed His Life for Fashion, Slams Other Italian Designers

There's no doubt that Giorgio Armani has made it in the fashion world. He's enjoyed a super-successful career for the past thirty years, has a persona
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Hayley Phelan
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There's no doubt that Giorgio Armani has made it in the fashion world. He's enjoyed a super-successful career for the past thirty years, has a persona
Photo: Getty

Photo: Getty

There's no doubt that Giorgio Armani has made it in the fashion world. He's enjoyed a super-successful career for the past thirty years, has a personal fortune valued at $7.2 billion, counts A-listers like George Clooney and the Beckhams as friends, and at 78-years-old, still manages to churn out four critically-acclaimed collections a year. So just how does he do it, you wonder?

Well, the designer spoke to Elle UK for a piece appearing in its September issue about just that--and the answer, it turns out, is pretty depressing.

"Life," he said, "I have sacrificed life. The life of a young man when I first started out and the life of a grown man at the age I am now."

He continued in this same depressing vein (quote via Vogue UK):

"It is even more so now. Even harder, which is very sad because life is all about friendships, discovering people's personalities, falling in love, not just once or twice, but often. In a word, life. To live in the world. For example, I don't know Milan. People tell me of Milan [He has lived in Milan since 1957]."

Give this man some Prozac! Stat!

As for his fellow Italian designers--brands like Roberto Cavalli, Versace, and Dolce & Gabbana--Armani had this to say:

"These designers have no reserve. They've chosen a path and thrown themselves onto it head first, regardless of everything. Whether or not their designs are sellable or vulgar. As long as it's new and people talk about it. That is the truth."

So then...we guess they don't all hang out in Milan (like they do in our fantasies).

As for why you don't see too many supermodels--or gimmicks--on the catwalk during Armani's shows, the designer said it's because, "I want the clothes to speak. The effort I put into my work must be respected."

Armani is a crazy talented designer who helped define modern workwear--and after 30 years in the biz (and 78 years on the planet) we think he's allowed to be a little grouchy. Still, it makes us kind of sad to think he's given up so much of his life for his career. Is there really no such thing as a work/life balance?