Alexander Wang Spring 2013 vs. Dion Lee and Tufi Duek

One of the standout shows so far this New York fashion week has been Alexander Wang’s sleek glow in the dark, rave inspired collection. The only problem? It looked a lot like recent collections from both Aussie designer Dion Lee and Brazilian designer Tufi Duek.
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One of the standout shows so far this New York fashion week has been Alexander Wang’s sleek glow in the dark, rave inspired collection. The only problem? It looked a lot like recent collections from both Aussie designer Dion Lee and Brazilian designer Tufi Duek.
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One of the standout shows so far this New York fashion week has been Alexander Wang’s sleek glow in the dark, rave inspired collection. The designer focused heavily on dresses and separates with cutout panels of fabric hanging together by sheer mesh. The effect made it appear as if the cloth merely floated--or, in the words, of the line sheet, 'suspended.'

However, it appears Mr. Wang isn’t the first designer to find himself mesmerized by the magic of "suspended" cloth. Dion Lee designed a dress for Fall 2012 that bares some striking similarities to Wang's. In fact, save for a few small differences--a slit here, another sheer cutout there--the dresses are nearly identical. Lee's dress is even described as 'suspended' on Net-a-Porter. And what's more, this isn't exactly your run-of-the-mill LBD--the use of sheer mesh paneling is both inventive and wholly originally. Or at least it was when Lee did it last season.

But here’s the kicker--this wasn’t the only part of Wang’s collection that felt a little too familiar. Take a look at these strappy heels from Brazilian designer Tufi Duek’s Spring 2011 collection. Getting serious deja vu, right? The similarities are unquestionable. In fact, when these Duek shoes first popped up on our screen, we thought they were simply Wang’s miss-labeled as Duek. It wasn’t until we took a closer look that we noticed the subtle differences, such as the slightly thinner straps of the Duek shoes, and the clunkier heel of the Wang version.

This now makes two adventures in copyright from one Alexander Wang collection. Whether you chalk it up to bad luck, or taking a little too much "inspiration" the similarities are a little too hard to ignore. What do you think? Is Wang just in tune with the style of the times, or is he peeking over his own paper to look at his classmate's work?

We've reached out to all three parties and are waiting for comment.