The Man Repeller Weighs in on Street Style Backlash, Admits That Getting Photographed is 'Addictive'

As someone who both wears outfits that street style photographers' dreams are made of, and also possesses a brain, Medine offers an interesting perspective.
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Dhani Mau
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As someone who both wears outfits that street style photographers' dreams are made of, and also possesses a brain, Medine offers an interesting perspective.
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As New York Fashion Week came to a close last week, one topic of discussion perhaps even more popular than what went down the runways was street style. Photographers created scenes in front of every major show while editors and bloggers pranced around them, pretending to be on their phones; The Times wrote an article about how the medium of street style is losing its authenticity, in which prominent bloggers and the agents that represent them all gave their takes; Scott Schuman told us he now only photographs people who don't want to be photographed. And now blogger and constant street style fodder Leandra Medine has taken to her own blog to weigh in on the "purity" of street style and the role she plays.

As someone who both wears outfits that street style photographers' dreams are made of, and also possesses a brain, Medine offers an interesting perspective. She admits taking photographers into consideration when deciding what to put on in the morning:

There are certainly moments when I put something on and either veto or acknowledge it’s power to instigate a photo-snap. This isn’t to say I change should the garment sway further toward a veto but the mere fact that this thinking process occurs speaks strongly to the power of the craft.

And she describes the feeling of getting her picture taken as "addictive:"

When I do find myself wearing snap-appropriate garb though, there is an undeniable ego-stroking-rush about standing amid a bike lane by Pier 59, clutching my purse and coyly smiling at an army of click-click-clicks, calling my name and asking me to look over.

It’s addictive, really–you just want to get it right over and over again.

At the same time, she pays respect to Scott Schuman for "not feeding" that addiction and predicts a "string of backlashes" that will lead to a move towards "simplicity, wearability and practicality" in fashion (which we're all for, by the way).

Medine, whose own career probably more or less relies on being photographed by street style photographers, may seem a little conflicted on the subject; but if photographers did ever stop taking her picture, she sounds like she'd be able to figure out some other reasons to live.