Roberto Cavalli Slams the Camera Nazionale della Moda, Armani and Dolce & Gabbana in Blog Post

While most of us thought that whole fashion week scheduling debacle had been settled, apparently the war is still raging in Milan. At least as far as Roberto Cavalli is concerned.
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While most of us thought that whole fashion week scheduling debacle had been settled, apparently the war is still raging in Milan. At least as far as Roberto Cavalli is concerned.
Getty

Getty

While most of us thought that whole fashion week scheduling debacle had been settled, apparently the war is still raging in Milan. At least as far as Roberto Cavalli is concerned.

Cavalli, who frequently uses his blog as a platform to speak his mind--and even speak out against powerful fashion figures--expressed his frustrations with Italy's national chamber of fashion on it earlier this week. He accuses the chamber of favoring big designers like Armani and Dolce & Gabbanna over smaller designers, and, we guess, himself.

"Camera Nazionale della Moda limits itself to scheduling fashion shows, twice a year," he writes. "The Cavalli maison has always been a member of the fashion chamber. I think that Armani is a member, too, but his every choice is perceived as an order! Dolce & Gabbana are not members but they don't care about others and pursue their own interests as if they were the only fashion house in Italy. Other relevant Italian brands are owned by French companies and, as usual, Italians pull out the red carpet for foreigners. The Camera Nazionale della Moda supports only big names, giving small companies what's left."

The scheduling issue for which he's blaming Armani and the Camera Nazionale is that Armani moved his show from Monday, the final day, to Sunday, leaving Cavalli as the only big name on the schedule on Monday. The concern is that editors will not stay long enough in Milan to see his show on Monday, as they may rather leave for Paris. As WWD points out, Cavalli had a similar situation occur a few years ago when Dolce & Gabbana scheduled their show indpendently from the official calendar to overlap with Cavalli's show and Cavalli was forced to move his show. He laments:

As usual, the Camera Nazionale della Moda is washing its hands of the situation and it will not go against the wishes of Little King Armani, and therefore the problems are mine alone. What can I do? Do I stay the final day, running the risk that some foreign journalists will forego my show, or should I overlap with smaller fry, smaller brands, acting as some of my colleagues do?

The Camera Nazionale della Moda denied the claims: “I dispute what Roberto Cavalli wrote on his blog,” said Camera della Moda president Mario Boselli to WWD. “If he says that the Italian Fashion Chamber only schedules the shows, it means that he completely overlooks our numerous activities also on international scene, where we are well respected.”

Do you think Cavalli is being snubbed, or is the fashion week format as a whole to blame for this dilemma?