The 3 Most Buzzed About Shows From Day 7

Is the fash pack getting more decisive or just more sleep deprived? Tough call. On the penultimate day of shows, consensus was Marchesa's Bollywood-inspired beaded and brocaded flights of fashion fancy when beyond the point of OTT, and by comparison Michael Kors's rugby striped prototypes felt a little, well, catalog. Meanwhile, way downtown at the Beekman Palace, with their grommeted perforated leather and digital reptilian printed spliced creations, the Proenza boys nailed the sweet spot between art and commerce. These are the most buzzed about collections on day 7 of NYFW.
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Is the fash pack getting more decisive or just more sleep deprived? Tough call. On the penultimate day of shows, consensus was Marchesa's Bollywood-inspired beaded and brocaded flights of fashion fancy when beyond the point of OTT, and by comparison Michael Kors's rugby striped prototypes felt a little, well, catalog. Meanwhile, way downtown at the Beekman Palace, with their grommeted perforated leather and digital reptilian printed spliced creations, the Proenza boys nailed the sweet spot between art and commerce. These are the most buzzed about collections on day 7 of NYFW.

L-R: Marchesa, Michael Kors, Proenza Schouler

L-R: Marchesa, Michael Kors, Proenza Schouler

Is the fash pack getting more decisive or just more sleep deprived? Tough call. On the penultimate day of shows, consensus was Marchesa's Bollywood-inspired beaded and brocaded flights of fashion fancy went beyond the point of OTT, and by comparison Michael Kors's rugby striped prototypes felt a little, well, catalog. Meanwhile, way downtown at the Beekman Palace, with their grommeted perforated leather and digital reptilian printed spliced creations, the Proenza boys nailed the sweet spot between art and commerce.

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Marchesa Designers: Georgina Chapman and Keren Craig

  • "A bit too costumey perhaps. But they do design with the red carpet in mind, which is about as costumey as it gets." {All The Rage/

    Los Angeles Times}

  • "Maybe I will lose the smock in favor of a Marchesa gown, where the fringe is so shiny and bouncy it might have been hacked off a thousand My Little Ponies' tails." {The Cut/New York Magazine}
  • "Elaborately decadent." {Daily Front Row}
  • "Marchesa may have offered a hint at what Blake Lively's wedding dress looked like." {The Daily Mail}
  • "This collection was pretty over-the-top, even for Marchesa. Craig and Chapman's approach to design has pretty much always been, Why use a key when ten sticks of dynamite will open the door just fine? And here they had a whole new vocabulary of embellishment to play with--elaborate threadwork, sari draping, fringe. Lots of fringe." {Style.com}
  • "A collision of the rarified and time-honored beading and embroidery skills of India, not to mention its wildly vivid color palette (chartreuse, garnet, fuchsia, coral, and, of course, pink) with the groovy countercultural swing of I-just-want-to-find-myself sixties London." {Vogue.com}
  • "It’s a hard fact to escape, that shows err on the side of slouchy downtown cool or refined, sophisticated polish. But Marchesa, however, is neither. In many ways it not only doesn’t belong in New York (in the physical sense), it doesn’t even belong on this earth--it’s a woman’s dreams made real, the fairytale princess who’s jumped from page to reality, and for that the label is a singular and wonderful thing." {Vogue.com UK}
  • "They approached India so literally--draped dresses with elaborate surface adornments, colorful saris, midriff-exposing ghagra choli--one almost expected an elephant to come down the runway or the models to break into a Bollywood dance number for the finale." {WWD}

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Michael Kors Designer: Michael Kors

  • "A self-avowedly optimistic Michael Kors embraced bold colors in a big way." {AFP}
  • "A strong, wearable take on spring's emerging trend for all things bold and graphic." {All The Rage/

    Los Angeles Times}

  • "An optimistic, cheerful and modernist collection." {The Associated Press}
  • "A graphic showing aligned with the stripe-y, sixties-happy concepts on other big names on the NYFW, from Marc to Tommy." {Daily Front Row}
  • " A remorselessly glossy collection." {The Daily Telegraph}
  • "[An] exuberant Sixties slick chic collection." {Fashion Wire Daily}
  • "Consistently polished and effortlessly glam, no fuss, no frills." {FashionEtc}
  • "All right, it's official: stripes are back. Not that they ever really left, but this week we've seen more of them on the New York runways than we can count. For Spring 2013, Michael Kors offered them up in spades." {fashionologie}
  • "More momsy than dynamic." {International Herald Tribune}
  • "The notes for the Michael Kors show said, 'Bold shades of sun, palm and sky.' Make that yellow, green and blue. No amount of spin could improve this flat collection of double-face shifts, preppy stripes and optical checks." {The New York Times}
  • "Consisted largely of preppy rugby stripes on bodysuits, pullovers, trousers and coats. It was not dissimilar to a mail-order catalog roughly from the late 1980s, if recollections of L.L. Bean and Lands’ End serve." {On The Runway/The New York Times}
  • "An exuberantly graphic collection, heavy on stripes, Op-art flourishes, and primary colors." {Vogue.com}
  • "Kors, an American designer to his core, took that soignée attitude and blended it with striking visuals lifted from the era's popular op art movement to prove that the lady and the vamp are often just two sides of the same woman." {Vogue.com UK}
  • "Virtually everything looked polished and appealing, projecting that wonderful, real kind of sexy that’s intrinsic to Kors’ work." {WWD}

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Proenza Schouler Designers: Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez

  • "Mind-blowingly cool. ... They built on the foundation of last season's experiment with a boxy, oversized silhouette, playing with fragments of images, colors and textures that flew by like so many pixels in our visually-overloaded digital world." {All The Rage/

    Los Angeles Times}

  • "The digital-print satin dresses decorated with neon nailheads on the tops and grommets on the bottom that served as the finale were only as Proenza Schouler can do." {The Associated Press}
  • "Modernity is further underscored by the clever application of grommets where someone with rather less ingenuity might settle for studs." {The Cut/New York Magazine}
  • "A mix-and-match approach to colors, materials, and textures worked brilliantly, especially when tricked out with sporty touches." {Daily Front Row}
  • "Perforated leather, reptilian prints, and studs and grommets were aplenty; and just as we were thinking this collection was as far from spring as it could be, the Proenza boys sent out feminine printed chiffon dresses that added a necessary lightness but retained the strength seen on the other bulkier pieces." {FashionEtc}
  • "From seriously hip leather and python patchwork vests to sexy-grunge halters, they provided a contemporary wardrobe of separates and frocks with plenty of personality." {Grazia Daily Magazine}
  • "Why the duo showed their densely decorated, digital-age collection in a grungy, condemned building way downtown in the financial district is as much of a mystery as how they piece together their wondrous concoctions." {International Herald Tribune}
  • "'How was it getting here?' Jack McCollough asked before the Proenza Schouler show on Wednesday. 'Was it too far?' 'Here' was an empty building on Beekman Street, an early skyscraper near City Hall whose scarred walls and cavernous rooms contained unimaginable stories. And, no, it was not too far to travel for a collection as rich and varied in its layers as the spring Proenza show." {On The Runway/The New York Times}
  • "McCollough and Hernandez claimed Tumblr as a point of reference, citing its random associations and the delight-producing effects of happenstance. They may be card-carrying members of the digital generation, but they're also incredibly hard workers. Kudos to them for setting the bar ever higher." {Style.com}
  • "With a collection of assured modernity, shown in the majestic shell of a nineteenth-century building, Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez seemed to still and quiet the noise and the chaos of our too-much-informational age." {Vogue.com}
  • "Building on the idea of collage, the boys constructed a collection with a decoupage quality, bringing together divergent ideas and smashing them together to exploit the garish beauty in their polarities." {Vogue.com UK}
  • "The designers dove down that clickable rabbit hole and came out at the highest resolution, showcasing their coolest, newest, most 'now' ideas. Let the superlatives rip." {WWD}