Yohji Yamamoto Spring 2013

In an exclusive interview with WWD last Friday, Yohji Yamamoto said that only about "2 or 3 percent" of the audience who watch his shows really understand and appreciate the level of work he puts into each collection. “Young people, be careful. Beautiful things are disappearing every day,” he said as he counseled them to resist adopting fast-fashion looks so that they might foster their own innate sense of style. The danger, Yamamoto seemed to suggest, lies in not understanding nuance in fashion in the face of "too much information by media, especially [through computers]."
Avatar:
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
2
In an exclusive interview with WWD last Friday, Yohji Yamamoto said that only about "2 or 3 percent" of the audience who watch his shows really understand and appreciate the level of work he puts into each collection. “Young people, be careful. Beautiful things are disappearing every day,” he said as he counseled them to resist adopting fast-fashion looks so that they might foster their own innate sense of style. The danger, Yamamoto seemed to suggest, lies in not understanding nuance in fashion in the face of "too much information by media, especially [through computers]."
Image Title61

Long Nguyen is the co-founder and style director of Flaunt. PARIS--In an exclusive interview with WWD last Friday, Yohji Yamamoto said that only about "2 or 3 percent" of the audience who watch his shows really understand and appreciate the level of work he puts into each collection. “Young people, be careful. Beautiful things are disappearing every day,” he said as he counseled them to resist adopting fast-fashion looks so that they might foster their own innate sense of style. The danger, Yamamoto seemed to suggest, lies in not understanding nuance in fashion in the face of "too much information by media, especially [through computers]."

And on on an elevated white runway inside the cavernous Salle Marcel Cerdan at Bercy, Yamamoto proved his words with a collection that was essentially ‘Yohji’ in construction and temperament. That meant long A-line dresses in light gray cotton; asymmetrical jackets; floor length crocheted skirts paired with slim-cut white jackets. These signature Yamamoto silhouettes and cutting techniques are refined each season, with only slight alterations of the draping or cutting. Under the bright runway lights, it seemed that some of the garments used too many techniques--like a black sleeveless tank that had layers of overlapping fabric falling to the floor. It was difficult to digest at times.

Yet still there was that simple short-sleeved long black dress--uncomplicated by extraneous design elements.

And Yamamoto never wrote off the younger generation he wished to speak to. The four olive military looks towards the middle of the show were a nod to the younger generation who are less adept to sophisticated designed garments but who may partially adopt a Yohji mantra. Surely he knows the critical importance of reaching out to the new generation, but he must do so with a slight ease of hand, even in his work on his Y-3 collaboration with Adidas.

Photos: Imaxtree