Nike Dumps Lance Armstrong

Lance Armstrong won't be "Just Do(ing) It" for Nike anymore. After years of investigation into Armstrong's alleged doping--and his repeated and vehement denials--the athlete is giving up the fight. Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles this summer, and today Nike announced they're dumping the athlete after more than 10 years with him.
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Lance Armstrong won't be "Just Do(ing) It" for Nike anymore. After years of investigation into Armstrong's alleged doping--and his repeated and vehement denials--the athlete is giving up the fight. Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles this summer, and today Nike announced they're dumping the athlete after more than 10 years with him.
Photo: Getty

Photo: Getty

Lance Armstrong won't be "Just Do(ing) It" for Nike anymore.

After years of investigation into Armstrong's alleged doping--and his repeated and vehement denials--the athlete is giving up the fight. Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles this summer, and today Nike announced they're dumping the athlete after more than 10 years with him.

Nike gave the following statement to ESPN:

Due to the seemingly insurmountable evidence that Lance Armstrong participated in doping and misled Nike for more than a decade, it is with great sadness that we have terminated our contract with him. Nike does not condone the use of illegal performance enhancing drugs in any manner. Nike plans to continue support of the Livestrong initiatives created to unite, inspire and empower people affected by cancer.

Sources also tell the sports news outlet that Nike will change the name of their Lance Armstrong Fitness Center training facility in Beaverton, OR.

Armstrong has resigned as chairman of Livestrong, the successful foundation he created to help those affected by cancer. ESPN notes that there are more than 100 Livestrong items available for sale on Nike's website.

It's unclear what will happen to Livestrong and its credibility without Armstrong as the face and voice. The foundation has sold $80 million worth of yellow wristbands since 2004 in support of cancer charities--and arguably started that whole charity wristband craze. Do you think the charity will survive without its flawed founder?