YSL Files Motion to Have Louboutin Case Dismissed--Is It Finally Over?

A true end is in sight for the now-18 month long Louboutin vs. YSL trademark case, thanks to YSL being super cool about everything. YSL is being the nice guy for once (we kid) and filed a motion today to dismiss all counterclaims against Louboutin, a lawyer for YSL has confirmed. Need a little recap on the red-sole lawsuit? We're here to help.
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A true end is in sight for the now-18 month long Louboutin vs. YSL trademark case, thanks to YSL being super cool about everything. YSL is being the nice guy for once (we kid) and filed a motion today to dismiss all counterclaims against Louboutin, a lawyer for YSL has confirmed. Need a little recap on the red-sole lawsuit? We're here to help.
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A true end is in sight for the now-18 month long Louboutin vs. YSL trademark case, thanks to YSL being super cool about everything.

To recap, right before New York Fashion Week, the court made a decision ruling that Louboutin has the right to trademark protection over his red soles and that other companies, YSL included, may continue to sell shoes with a red sole, so long as the entire shoe is red.

Both YSL and Louboutin sent out press releases declaring victory--which were valid, as they both essentially got what they wanted. But while Louboutin's claims against YSL have been settled, YSL's counterclaims against Loubutin have yet to be litigated--and it sounds like they probably won't be. YSL is being the nice guy for once (we kid) and filed a motion today to dismiss all counterclaims against Louboutin, a lawyer for YSL has confirmed.

The counterclaims included a request for cancellation of Louboutin's U.S. trademark registration; and "tortious interference and unfair competition" referring to Louboutins efforts to get retailers to return YSL's red-soled shoes to YSL.

A press release from YSL states:

Now that the Court of Appeals has definitively ruled for Yves Saint Laurent and has dismissed Christian Louboutin’s claims, Yves Saint Laurent has decided to end what was left of the litigation and refocus its energies on its business and its creative designs. By dismissing the case now, Yves Saint Laurent also wishes to ensure that the Court will not make any further rulings that put at risk the ability of fashion designers to trademark color in appropriate cases.

So what's next, YSL? A formal apology to Cathy Horyn?