Cacharel Will Become Cacharel Paris, Have Lower Price Points

Cacharel has a new CEO, plans to bring design back in-house, change the name of collections to Cacharel Paris, and reposition the line from designer to contemporary. Here's why this is interesting.
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Dhani Mau
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Cacharel has a new CEO, plans to bring design back in-house, change the name of collections to Cacharel Paris, and reposition the line from designer to contemporary. Here's why this is interesting.
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We're seeing a lot of restructuring at fashion brands these days.

The latest example is Cacharel, who, like another Paris label, just appointed a new CEO.

Richard Alibert, who hales from Céline and Bonpoint, took the reigns yesterday as the company also announced plans to bring design back in-house, change the name of collections to Cacharel Paris, and reposition the line from designer to contemporary. Talented design duo Ling Liu and Dawei Sun, who took over for Cédric Charlier when his contract was mysteriously not renewed last year, will remain at the design helm.

However, they'll be designing at a 30% to 40% lower price point. According to WWD, shirts will be priced at $195 to $235; dresses at $325 to $455, and coats around $650.

It makes sense (and is great news for us). The label's recent offerings have been charming, well-tailored and pretty, but always seemed a little too expensive. At this price point, we could see Cacharel competing with the likes of Vanessa Bruno and Carven--another French house that recently relaunched with a new image and lower price point.

We're not quite as fond of the decision to tack "Paris" onto the end of their name, like another French fashion house did recently. It seems unnecessary. The change appears to be part of an effort to strengthen Cacharel's French identity. “The brand has to be strong in Paris and in France. If we are not strong here, then we can’t pretend to be strong elsewhere,” Cacharel founder and president Jean Bousquet told the trade.

The new name will go into effect for fall 2013.