Get the Scoop on Glamour.com's Relaunch and New Hires

With 5.5 million monthly uniques and five million followers on social media, Glamour.com is the largest web property out of Conde Nast's women's magazines. But Glamour editor-in-chief Cindi Leive, along with Digital Managing Director Mike Hofman are looking to grow even bigger. "These are numbers we've achieved with our old site, which is fine, but certainly not the kind of site that was going to take us out of the magazine companion site category and really make us a player," Leive told us. Despite the fact that ad pages in print mags still draw more money for publishers, Leive understand the importance of digital (something that can't be said for all print editors).
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Leah Chernikoff
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With 5.5 million monthly uniques and five million followers on social media, Glamour.com is the largest web property out of Conde Nast's women's magazines. But Glamour editor-in-chief Cindi Leive, along with Digital Managing Director Mike Hofman are looking to grow even bigger. "These are numbers we've achieved with our old site, which is fine, but certainly not the kind of site that was going to take us out of the magazine companion site category and really make us a player," Leive told us. Despite the fact that ad pages in print mags still draw more money for publishers, Leive understand the importance of digital (something that can't be said for all print editors).
A look at Glamour's new site

A look at Glamour's new site

If you've visited Glamour.com today you may have noticed things look a bit different. Well, a lot different. The site unveiled a massive relaunch today nearly a year in the making.

With 5.5 million monthly uniques and five million followers on social media, Glamour.com is the largest web property out of Conde Nast's women's magazines. But Glamour editor-in-chief Cindi Leive, along with Digital Managing Director Mike Hofman are looking to grow even bigger.

"These are numbers we've achieved with our old site, which is fine, but certainly not the kind of site that was going to take us out of the magazine companion site category and really make us a player," Leive told us.

Despite the fact that ad pages in print mags still draw more money for publishers, Leive understands the importance of digital (something that can't be said for all print editors). "We have a young tech obsessed reader in her early 20s and 30s," she said. "There’s no way you can thrive today as a brand aimed at young women if you have a print-first mentality and I think you can’t survive if you have a print versus digital mentality."

Though at this point, it seems obvious that any print publication needs an even stronger website with original content to stay relevant, Conde Nast has always been slow to invest in the web properties that correspond to its leading magazines. Lucky for Glamour, it got a major investment from the powers that be. "We are committed to investing in innovation at Conde Nast, and Glamour is a great example of a powerhouse brand that continues to evolve on its multiple platforms," Conde Nast's President Bob Sauerberg said in a statement.

The site is now image-heavy, as Leive notes, "our user has become a much more visual consumer." If it looks kinda Pinterest-y, well, that's the point. "I guess Pinterest was the thing that, a year ago, we were just noticing it showing up on our referral traffic reports in a big way and now we’re taking a lot of inspiration from it because it’s changed the way that people, especially women, browse the internet," Hofman told us. "We see that our users behavior is changing based on the rise of Pinterest and we want to capture that energy." To that end, the site has invested heavily in original imagery and every image can be shared individually on social media.

But there a lot of other big changes. Namely, some new big name hires. Nikki Ogunnaike has been brought on from In Style, WWD's Amy Wicks has been brought on as a contributor to beef up reporting in the fashion vertical in the "Dressed" blog (formerly known as "Slaves to Fashion") and the New York Times' Megan Angelo will contribute to "Obsessed," covering pop culture and entertainment both online and in the magazine.

While this might not be the best news for us, a shoestring competitor, it's nice to see the mags stepping up their game online.