The Fuck Yeah Menswear Guys Explain the Whole #Menswear Thing to Us

We caught up with Kevin Burrows and Lawrence Schlossman, authors of the hilarious menswear phenomenon Fuck Yeah Menswear to chat about their blog, just-released book, and what half of the stuff they’re talking about actually means (because seriously, they speak a different language).
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We caught up with Kevin Burrows and Lawrence Schlossman, authors of the hilarious menswear phenomenon Fuck Yeah Menswear to chat about their blog, just-released book, and what half of the stuff they’re talking about actually means (because seriously, they speak a different language).
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The #menswear clan—referred to as such with equal parts affection and disdain—consists of writers, designers and editors obsessed with natty dressing. You know, the guys from Gilt Manual, GQ, the former Men.Style editors. Then there’s the massively successful blogs: A Continuous Lean, The Impossible Cool and of course, The Sartorialist (which features plenty of women, too).

But while #menswear’s been nothing but good for men’s fashion—think about all the dudes wearing pocket squares to the last wedding you attended—it can also feel a bit ridiculous.

Enter serial blogger Lawrence Schlossman—editor-in-chief of menswear site

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Fashionista: How did Fuck Yeah Menswear come about? Lawrence Schlossman: We were both in this [menswear] world and I guess at a certain point..you know, we loved it but at the same time I think it was super-serious, almost too serious. I remember tweeting kind of off-the-cuff, “wouldn’t it be funny if there was a

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It’s a reflection of this whole #menswear thing. Do you think it’s only affecting this small community of people, or is it influencing the greater culture? K: I think it’s still definitely niche, but I think every month I see it growing more and more. I see more guys out on the street who clearly have read these blogs. They know what they’re doing, they’re getting dressed up. It’s really starting to catch on. But it is always going to be this hardcore group of guys—super hardcore nerds.

Can you give us an example of something #menswear-related that you think is just over-the-top ridiculous, and that you do yourself? K: Sometimes I have to take a step back because I know everything so intimately that I can’t really enjoy clothing anymore. Like, thinking the sleeve is a half-inch too long on my favorite shirt or, I wish the hem were slightly longer on my jacket. And so, I think it’s kind of that whole attitude of always having to have the next coolest thing. And I think that’s a moment where, okay guys, we need to take a step back.

There’s this homoerotic thing about the #menswear clique. Like, “We love fashion, brah! We love each other! By the way, we’re straight.” Is there a division between “straight men’s fashion” and “gay men’s fashion?” K: I think it’s definitely merging. Especially now, with this whole #menswear group being around for a couple of years and continuing to grow, guys are definitely more comfortable just kind of wearing whatever they want and actually starting to think about their own personal style and not just, “Oh, I’m wearing this jacket because it’s the best jacket you could wear.” I think that it is this very fratty, fraternal thing. Like you’re in a club or on a sports team and you’re all hanging out together, just geeking out on each other’s clothing. Which sometimes, yeah, it’s just a very bizarre thing. You show up at a bar and instead of going to talk to the girl you go up to your buddy and say, “Oh man, can we talk about your jacket, because it’s really, really sick.”

Which is what girls do. K: Exactly. L: I think there are differences between menswear customers, and oftentimes it could be divided along the sexual orientation line. The reason that a book like this can even exist and that menswear on the internet got all this press is because at some point down the line straight guys got more comfortable discussing men’s clothing. That was kind of because of the trends that were pushed at the time—things like heritage and Americana and typically manly things—appeal to a straight guy. I think he felt more comfortable suddenly. High fashion is more on the radar of the average guy than ever before. You know, celebrities, especially rappers, Kanye, are getting into it. It’s like Lady Gaga—even though fashion has always been important to women, she’s brought a lot of brands to the forefront, to a fan that might not be so concerned with fashion. I think Kanye’s doing that with guys. ASAP Rocky is doing the same thing.

Where we’re at today, I think we’re making progress. Like Kevin said, those lines are getting blurred. It’s not like this childish straight v. gay thing. I think everyone’s better for it.

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So, why should my husband buy this book? He isn’t really into the whole #menswear thing. (He does like J.Crew.) K: It’s a time-capsule of this subculture. You’re gonna learn about it, but you’re gonna laugh about it, too. We have a lexicon where we break down the terms, stores and brands, style archetypes—so you get the wider context so that the jokes become funnier. Pretty much everyone who I’ve showed it to that has absolutely no context, once they start getting into the book, they have a really good time with it.

What’s the next awesome-but-ridiculous trend? You know, the ironic mustache of 2013? K: Maybe the next thing we’re gonna make fun of is people not taking it seriously enough. Like, “guys, you can’t laugh about this anymore. This is now really serious.” L: Yeah, maybe we’ll get super-meta on everyone and just freakin’ complete the loop on it, like Joseph Gordon Levitt shooting Bruce Willis in the face. To be completely honest today on Fuck Yeah Menswear, if Kevin and I were gonna write a new post, the funniest, most meta thing we could do would be to write a legitimate, serious blog post on like, the factory where Red Wing boots are made in Idaho, during a strike, when the union….like that would be the most ridiculous thing we could do now. I don’t know if we want to do that, I don’t know what’s next for us, but if we have fun doing it…. That’s the reason we did in the first place. It wasn’t to sell a book, or make any money, or to create a brand, or whatever. All we wanted to do is have fun, and really fuck around for lack of a better word. If an opportunity or something pops up, whether it’s a trend or some other thing and we get the chance to really enjoy writing about menswear, then we’re gonna do it. We wouldn’t even think twice.

Click through to get a peek at what's inside the book.