Oscar de la Renta Thinks Anna Wintour Should Become Secretary of State

While some outlets mocked the idea of Anna Wintour becoming an ambassador, others (including us) thought she'd make a great ambassador, if she were interested, which she probably isn't. Oscar de la Renta, on the other hand, thinks the White House would have to up their offer to snag Wintour.
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While some outlets mocked the idea of Anna Wintour becoming an ambassador, others (including us) thought she'd make a great ambassador, if she were interested, which she probably isn't. Oscar de la Renta, on the other hand, thinks the White House would have to up their offer to snag Wintour.
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One of Tuesday's most buzzed about rumors--from within fashion circles to mainstream media--was Anna Wintour's future as a UK Ambassador.

Wintour had denied the same rumors earlier this year and Vogue commented officially that Wintour is "very happy with her current job." But that didn't stop everyone from weighing in. While some outlets mocked the idea, others (including us) thought she'd make a great ambassador, if she were interested, which she probably isn't.

Oscar de la Renta, on the other hand, thinks the White House would have to up its offer to snag Wintour. He told WWD this morning,

When you are editor in chief of an extremely successful magazine, you don’t need an ambassadorship for four years. Ambassadors were great in the 18th century. Today, it’s going to the opening of a cafeteria.

She should be named Secretary of State. That would be a different story.

He also said she'd never leave her job at Vogue, pointing out that becoming an ambassador requires one to spend a lot of money with little pay.

He makes a good point--perhaps being an ambassador would be too easy and boring for Wintour, who's used to essentially managing the entire fashion industry--not an easy task.

So what will she do? She's 63 and has to leave Vogue eventually, right? WWD speculates that she'll go for a larger role within Condé Nast--something similar to the one Alexander Liberman held when he served as creative director overseeing all Condé Nast titles.