Raf Simons Casually Disses John Galliano's Designs Yet Again

Naturally, journalists are curious about Simons's opinion of the designer he replaced--and he's been pretty forthcoming. Most recently, he went so far as to suggest that Christian Dior would probably not be a fan of John Galliano's eccentric designs.
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Dhani Mau
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Naturally, journalists are curious about Simons's opinion of the designer he replaced--and he's been pretty forthcoming. Most recently, he went so far as to suggest that Christian Dior would probably not be a fan of John Galliano's eccentric designs.
Imaxtree

Imaxtree

Obviously, Raf Simons's designs for Dior so far have been a major departure from the more dramatic, fantastical aesthetic John Galliano established for the house--a departure we all anticipated when Simons was hired.

So, naturally, journalists are curious about his opinion of the designer he replaced--and Simons has been pretty forthcoming. Most recently, he went so far as to suggest that Christian Dior would probably not be a fan of John Galliano's eccentric designs.

"[Christian] Dior's ultimate obsession is that he wanted [the public] to wear it. I want them to wear it on the street," he told Alexandra Shulman in the January issue of Vogue UK. "If it doesn't relate to the outside, then it would be very theatrical for me."

Of course, while Simons doesn't come right out and say it, the implication is that Galliano's designs, being overtly theatrical (and largely unwearable to the general public), wouldn't have gotten the approval of the brand's founder.

It's not the first time Simons has been publicly critical of Galliano's work. In Vogue Australia's December issue he said,

“I have so much respect for John [Galliano]‘s technical skill and the fantasy, it’s just something that I don’t find relevant now, especially when it restricts a woman, because in every other area they have so much freedom.”

Simons also elaborated on his goals to develop a code for the house, which he compares to Chanel. "The Chanel woman? I don't even need to see, I smell her from round the corner, but I don't recognize the Dior woman," he said. "I want to work on that fast. Chanel has the deux-pièces with the pockets, or the bouclé, but what is it for Dior nowadays? I can't say."

It's tough to say who was better--Simons or Galliano--but, it does seem like house codes and making clothes people will actually wear are of utmost importance nowadays, and it will surely be exciting to see what new codes Simons establishes for Dior.