Romeo Beckham's Burberry Campaign Spurs Age Debate, Vogue UK EIC Alexandra Shulman Weighs In

Ten-year-old Romeo Beckham may have already scored himself a Burberry campaign, but he'll have to wait a while--six years, precisely--before he graces the pages of Vogue. That's when Romeo will meet the minimum acceptable age established by Vogue's health initiative--and according to British Vogue EIC Alexandra Shulman, the magazine won't feature him until then.
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Ten-year-old Romeo Beckham may have already scored himself a Burberry campaign, but he'll have to wait a while--six years, precisely--before he graces the pages of Vogue. That's when Romeo will meet the minimum acceptable age established by Vogue's health initiative--and according to British Vogue EIC Alexandra Shulman, the magazine won't feature him until then.
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Ten-year-old Romeo Beckham may have already scored himself a Burberry campaign, but he'll have to wait a while--six years, precisely--before he graces the pages of Vogue.

That's when Romeo will meet the minimum acceptable age established by Vogue's health initiative--and according to British Vogue EIC Alexandra Shulman, the magazine won't feature him until then.

Schulman tweeted yesterday, "Romeo Beckham @Burberry doesn't meet Vogue model health initiative criteria of over 16's only."

According to the Telegraph, model Edie Campbell, who stars alongside Romeo in the Burberry ads, fired back, "what about features on - e.g. - [15-year-old] Chloe Moretz?"

Schulman then responded, "Pre model health initiative rule but child actors probably in a different category."

So will Romeo's Burberry ads be, gasp, banned in Vogue? Not quite. Schulman later clarified that the ban only applied to the pages of the magazines saying, "We don't control runways or advertising."

While the health initiative does state that Vogue "will not knowingly work with models under the age of 16," the rules were thought to mostly apply to young up-and-coming models, like Ondria Hardin. Since profiles of famous or well-to-do families are a staple at the glossy, and butt-naked babies are one of its favorite accessories, it was our understanding of the initiative's rules that as long as children under the age of 16 were portrayed as children, Vogue could feature them.

Is Schulman taking too hard a line, or do you think that featuring children under the age of 16 is always a no-no for Vogue?