Julianne Moore Talks Fashion in Politics

Stunning in black Givenchy and vintage gold Van Cleef & Arpels jewelry, Moore sat down with us to discuss how portraying the divisive Governor-turned Vice Presidential candidate-turned reality star informed her views on the double standard women face in politics: “I absolutely feel that women in politics are unfairly judged based on their physical appearance and fashion choices. Nobody talks about how [men in politics] wear their hair or whether or not their outfits are attractive.”
Avatar:
Corinn Jackson
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
24
Stunning in black Givenchy and vintage gold Van Cleef & Arpels jewelry, Moore sat down with us to discuss how portraying the divisive Governor-turned Vice Presidential candidate-turned reality star informed her views on the double standard women face in politics: “I absolutely feel that women in politics are unfairly judged based on their physical appearance and fashion choices. Nobody talks about how [men in politics] wear their hair or whether or not their outfits are attractive.”
Getty

Getty

On Saturday, we stopped by LoveGold’s glittering cocktail party at the Chateau Marmont’s Selma House celebrating Julianne Moore’s Golden Globe nomination for playing Sarah Palin in HBO’s Game Change.

Stunning in black Givenchy and vintage gold Van Cleef & Arpels jewelry, Moore sat down with us to discuss how portraying the divisive Governor-turned Vice Presidential candidate-turned reality star informed her views on the double standard women face in politics: “I absolutely feel that women in politics are unfairly judged based on their physical appearance and fashion choices. Nobody talks about how [men in politics] wear their hair or whether or not their outfits are attractive.”

Moore called it “ridiculous” that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has to worry about her little scrunchy problem while traveling the world on state business, saying the beauty demands placed on female politicians would be considered “laughable” if they were imposed on their male counterparts.

Moore also said working on the film showed her that there are “unfortunate parallels to show business in the electoral process.” While Moore is known for physically inhabiting every role, from the feathered bangs, bell-bottoms and bandeaus of Amber Waves in 1997’s Boogie Nights to the Bumpits, wire-rimmed glasses, and short skirt suits of Palin in Game Change, she said the make-believe that goes along with moviemaking makes sense because “we are in the business of telling stories.” However, Moore learned that much of the slick production involved in Hollywood applies to politics, with makeup and wardrobe budgets part of the political package: “In politics, it is supposed to be about truth, but...so much [can be] manufactured.”

Click through for more pics from the event.

In Collaboration with LoveGold

Photos: Getty