Beyoncé's Super Bowl Designer Answers All Our Burning Questions

Beyoncé put a new designer on the map last night. For her Super Bowl halftime spectacular, she and everyone else on stage wore costumes by New York-based designer Rubin Singer--not Givenchy, not Mugler, but 34-year-old Rubin Singer, whose eponymous line is just six years old. Cathy Horyn's story in the New York Times, breaking the news that Singer had designed Beyoncé's costumes for the Super Bowl was headlined, "Hey, Beyoncé, It’s Your Look, but Maybe His Moment." Based on the buzz Singer is getting today (his publicist tells us the phone has been ringing off the hook and there's an increased interest in Singer's fall/winter 2013 presentation next week), we'd say it's definitely his moment. We hopped on the phone with Singer just before he left New Orleans less than an hour ago. He told us how he's feeling, how he kept it all a secret, and what he hopes to do with the exposure.
Avatar:
Leah Chernikoff
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
205
Beyoncé put a new designer on the map last night. For her Super Bowl halftime spectacular, she and everyone else on stage wore costumes by New York-based designer Rubin Singer--not Givenchy, not Mugler, but 34-year-old Rubin Singer, whose eponymous line is just six years old. Cathy Horyn's story in the New York Times, breaking the news that Singer had designed Beyoncé's costumes for the Super Bowl was headlined, "Hey, Beyoncé, It’s Your Look, but Maybe His Moment." Based on the buzz Singer is getting today (his publicist tells us the phone has been ringing off the hook and there's an increased interest in Singer's fall/winter 2013 presentation next week), we'd say it's definitely his moment. We hopped on the phone with Singer just before he left New Orleans less than an hour ago. He told us how he's feeling, how he kept it all a secret, and what he hopes to do with the exposure.
Image Title1

Beyoncé put a new designer on the map last night.

For her Super Bowl halftime spectacular, she and everyone else on stage wore costumes by New York-based designer Rubin Singer--not Givenchy, not Mugler, but 34-year-old Rubin Singer, whose eponymous line is just six years old. Cathy Horyn's story in the New York Times, breaking the news that Singer had designed Beyoncé's costumes for the Super Bowl was headlined, "Hey, Beyoncé, It’s Your Look, but Maybe His Moment." Based on the buzz Singer is getting today (his publicist tells us the phone has been ringing off the hook and there's an increased interest in Singer's fall/winter 2013 presentation next week), we'd say it's definitely his moment.

We hopped on the phone with Singer just before he left New Orleans less than an hour ago. He told us how he's feeling, how he kept it all a secret, and what he hopes to do with the exposure.

Fashionista: First - congrats! What has the reaction been like? A moment like this, having such massive exposure and people receiving it so well, will have tremendous impact on the exposure of the brand. People are hearing the name and getting it out there.

What was the process like? I had to complete work in secret. I couldn't say anything to anyone but the people on the inner circle. When I started meeting with Beyoncé to develop the concept it was very hush-hush. I couldn't say anything until yesterday.

Was it hard to keep quiet? I just kept my mouth closed. At the end of the day, if everybody found out.. I would just never jeopardize my relationship with her. I've worked with her for so long and have such a good relationship with her. Plus it would ruin the surprise and excitement!

So what's next? Fashion week. We're starting to book appointments for fashion week. Luckily the collection is completely in sync with what I did for her.

Image Title2

The collection is called “Valkyrie’s Dominion” - what's it all about? It's really about a strong empowered woman and making her feel amazing in fashion. I was also inspired by Helmut Newton photography and German film stars from the '30s like Marlene Dietrich.

Lots of people are hearing your name for the first time today--what do you want people to know about you? They should know that the philosophy of my clothes is social artwork. My construction and my draping are the most important elements of my work. The most amazing thing about the performance was that all three pieces she wore were representative of what I do: The black motorcycle jacket with asymmetrical collar was all about construction; the skirt was draped, and it was very intrinsic to the draping I do--layered and multidimensional; and then the paneling and use of exotic skins and leather on the bodysuit. [Singer used python, iguana, lamb leather, and Chantilly lace to construct the bodysuit.]

Where do you source your materials? Most fabrics comes from Italy. I developed the liquid nylon skirt especially for the collection--that's silk, metal, and plastic. The lace came from Switzerland.

What's your longterm goal as a designer? Where do you see your line in ten years? My goal is ultimately to become part of the cultural zeitgeist. You want to the brand that becomes associated with a certain look or sensibility. My immediate goal is to explore this partnership further--there's momentum and we hope to build on that.