How Your Tweets During Fashion Shows are Driving Sales

You can watch pretty much any designer runway show from the comfort of your own couch these days thanks to livestreaming. Designers run them on their Facebook pages, on specific livestream sites, and on fashion websites like this one. While you, the at-home fashion consumer, may be watching for entertainment or to make your shopping list for the next season, know this: The brands are also watching you (and your tweets) closely.
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You can watch pretty much any designer runway show from the comfort of your own couch these days thanks to livestreaming. Designers run them on their Facebook pages, on specific livestream sites, and on fashion websites like this one. While you, the at-home fashion consumer, may be watching for entertainment or to make your shopping list for the next season, know this: The brands are also watching you (and your tweets) closely.
This Marc by Marc Jacobs bag got a lot of positive Twitter chatter. (Photo: Imaxtree)

This Marc by Marc Jacobs bag got a lot of positive Twitter chatter. (Photo: Imaxtree)

You can watch pretty much any designer runway show from the comfort of your own couch these days thanks to livestreaming. Designers run them on their Facebook pages, on specific livestream sites, and on fashion websites like this one. While you, the at-home fashion consumer, may be watching for entertainment or to make your shopping list for the next season, know this: The brands are also watching you (and your tweets) closely.

While brands originally livestreamed for marketing purposes, they now use livestreams to glean all sorts of data about what items may sell, according to a piece in today's New York Times. Turns out buyers are no longer the sole decision-makers about what might sell--brands are increasingly looking to the armchair critics now, too.

Belstaff's chief marketing officer, Damian Mould, told the NYT that the brand made some internal buying decisions based on tweets during the livestream of the fall 2013 show; apparently there was enthusiastic Twitter response to the first five looks out. “I’ve informed the buying team of that interest, so I know they’re going to buy big and deep in that category when the product comes in,” Mould said. A bag style on the Marc by Marc Jacobs runway garnered similar enthusiastic Twitter gushing, and the brand "alerted its buyers" in reaction.

While tweets are not as scientific as hard pre-order data, brands are getting more savvy every season. According to the New York Times, 20 to 40 percent more people are watching livestreams every year and the data is becoming more precise.

That tweet you sent out about that killer coat? Big brother is listening, and stocking up accordingly.