Karl Lagerfeld Sketches Confusing Lesbian Tribute to Franco-German Relations

Who better to take on Franco-German relations than Karl Lagerfeld, German designer and king of French fashion?
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Who better to take on Franco-German relations than Karl Lagerfeld, German designer and king of French fashion?
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Who better to take on Franco-German relations than Karl Lagerfeld, German designer and king of French fashion?

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Elysée Treaty, or Treaty of Friendship, which signified the end of a centuries-long rivalry between France and Germany, Lagerfeld lent his famous sketching skills to German magazine Frankfurter Allgemeine Magazin's fashion issue.

And naturally, he incorporated a political statement about same-sex marriage, as he is wont to do these days. The sketch, WWD has deduced, features a lesbian couple with two children: One child is François Hollande, the French president and the other Angela Merkel, the German chancellor.

He first publicly addressed the issue of same-sex marriage in France at his couture show in January, where two female models holding hands closed the show. At the time, he said that while he supported same-sex marriage, he did not support gay couples adopting.

This is the same magazine for which Lagerfeld inexplicably sketched Barack Obama as a chef for the issue following his re-election, so clearly they're fans of his less coherent work.

Update: For further insight into this sketch, Art History expert/Fashionista contributor Steff Yotka explains: The lesbian couple are the personifications of the countries France and Germany. Marianne, the personification of France, on the left and Germania (Germany, duh) on the right. You can tell by Marianne's red cap and Germania's crown of the Holy Roman Empire and sword. So, ultimately, Karl is showing France and Germany in a loving lesbian relationship.

How sweet. And funny because Karl's 20-year-long feud with Ines de la Fressange began when she posed for a likeness of a bust of Marianne.