Mugler Fall 2013: Traveling Through Time in Style

PARIS-- "Muglerrrr...Muglerrrrr...." I can't think of Mugler without thinking about the vaguely pornographic video Nicola Formichetti created to coincide with his Spring 2012 menswear collection for the futuristic brand, on which he works with designer Sebastien Peigne. Maybe that's a good thing, because Mugler's redefined identity—an out there version of its already out-there ethos—has stayed with me. And it was fully evident in fall 2013's collection.
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PARIS-- "Muglerrrr...Muglerrrrr...." I can't think of Mugler without thinking about the vaguely pornographic video Nicola Formichetti created to coincide with his Spring 2012 menswear collection for the futuristic brand, on which he works with designer Sebastien Peigne. Maybe that's a good thing, because Mugler's redefined identity—an out there version of its already out-there ethos—has stayed with me. And it was fully evident in fall 2013's collection.
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PARIS-- "Muglerrrr...Muglerrrrr...." I can't think of Mugler without thinking about the vaguely pornographic video Nicola Formichetti created to coincide with his Spring 2012 menswear collection for the futuristic brand, on which he works with designer Sebastien Peigne.

Maybe that's a good thing, because Mugler's redefined identity—an out there version of its already out-there ethos—has stayed with me. And it was fully evident in fall 2013's collection.

In the show notes, Formichetti said that the duo "wanted to explore the idea of travel through time, in style." That resulted in plenty of Balenciaga and Courreges-inspired, Jetsons-appropriate looks, but with that goofy, I don't-give-a-fuck Mugler twist. (While Lady Gaga was not present, plenty of her born-this-way little monsters posed for the camera with the same attitude. They surely loved the headset-like Alexis Bittar earrings encircling the model's ears.)

The first set, wool skirt suits in dove grey, peach and other pastel colors, read quite proper. Well, other than the odd bunches of fabric protruding from the waist. They used similar fabrics for matching wool tops and trousers—a white version was particularly palatable, and could sell far beyond the confines of Mugler's very specific client.

As the show progressed, the duo began adding in more and more amoeba-like shapes, sometimes in blazers, other times in satin dresses. It was all very weird, but in a way that was very Mugler. The new Mugler.

Photos: IMAXtree