Snoop Lion Talks Wearing Horse Fur, Getting Manicures Like a 'Real Player' for Vice's Fashion Issue

This is absolutely the best gift we could have been given at the tail end of a long New York Fashion Week. Snoop Lion on getting French tips: "It’s about being spooned and groomed, dipped and whipped, suited and booted, gooted and looted, scuttered and buttered." Read on for more highlights.
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This is absolutely the best gift we could have been given at the tail end of a long New York Fashion Week. Snoop Lion on getting French tips: "It’s about being spooned and groomed, dipped and whipped, suited and booted, gooted and looted, scuttered and buttered." Read on for more highlights.
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This is absolutely the best gift we could have been given at the tail end of a long New York Fashion Week.

Terry Richardson (anyone else would have just been wrong) photographed Snoop Lion for the cover and a hefty editorial in Vice's fashion issue, which takes an epic look back at Snoop's style through the ages--including "real artifacts" pulled from his "wardrobe archive," which we're so glad is a thing that exists. The story includes a "Special thanks to Milk Studios" (maybe for allowing an absurd amount of weed to be smoked during the shoot?)

Snoop (formerly Dogg) follows up last year's fashion issue which featured an actual dog--in an S&M outfit. (The rapper changed his name to Snoop Lion during a trip to Jamaica where he recorded a Reggae album, the subject of a Vice documentary due out March 15 called Reincarnated.)

In Vice's interview, Snoop Lion was happy to answer every question they (/everyone?) had about his style dating back to his early '90s west coast rapping days, bringing up everything from Crip suits to pimp style to flannel shirts to his signature French manicures. Read on for some of our favorite things Snoop Lion said about fashion.

On dressing like a pimp:

One thing about that look is that it represented you, your girls, the car that you drove, and this is in the pimp world. It represented the pimp. If his color scheme was green and yellow, he had on green and yellow, his car was green and yellow, his apartment was green and yellow, the girls wore green and yellow, and everything was about that particular color scheme. They matched all the way from the top to the bottom. It was about flair, glamour, glitz, and all of that comes out of the era I grew up in. I was infatuated after seeing it from afar. Most of my uncles dibbled and dabbled in pimping, and my wife’s father was one of the biggest pimps around. It was fascinating for me to see that look and say that I was in that world and to wear that fashion for the eyes of the world. It was a beautiful feeling because I know what that fashion means; it’s a real fashion statement.

On his signature French tips:

Even when I’m getting getting my nails done, that’s real player. The average guy can’t see himself getting a French-tip manicure, but I’m not the average guy.

How long have you been getting French tips? It’s about being spooned and groomed, dipped and whipped, suited and booted, gooted and looted, scuttered and buttered.

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On fur:

Where did you get the purple fur coat that you were wearing in the shoot? Was it custom-made? I’ve never seen anything like it. [laughs] That’s out of the pimp files. I’ve got so many different animal furs: beavers, chinchillas, lambs, horses…

Horses? Yeah, I got horses, too. I got everything, man. Everything. You understand?

On one particularly grand outfit he wore while in the pimp world:

One year I remember I had a big black-and-gold sombrero with diamonds and rhinestones on it, and I had it tied around my head. All my girls dressed like they were Mexican girls, and it was just awesome. When I was there I was the real el jefe.

On where he shops now that Rastafarianism has changed his style:

I got a store that I shop in, you understand me? Rastafari, sugah! I don’t want to give that location out because I don’t want to have too many people looking like me. You know, before I know it I’ll see you doing the interview looking just like me.

On how his hair tells a story:

Even when I wore it in pigtails, or permed my hair like Shirley Temple, whatever it was, it was always something that was on the edge. It was like, “Wow, it looks nice.” But it was always different, so even now that I’m locking up, this is me being me. My hair has always told the story, and this is my journey at the moment.

Head over to Vice for the full interview.