John Galliano's Case Against Dior Heads to Appeals Court

Expect the John Galliano vs. Dior labor dispute case to drag on for quite a while. In the latest development, the suit is moving to a French appeals court because the two sides are still splitting hairs over whether the case should be heard in a labor court, or a commercial court. That's right--there's yet to be a single argument heard.
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Expect the John Galliano vs. Dior labor dispute case to drag on for quite a while. In the latest development, the suit is moving to a French appeals court because the two sides are still splitting hairs over whether the case should be heard in a labor court, or a commercial court. That's right--there's yet to be a single argument heard.
Photo: Getty

Photo: Getty

Expect the John Galliano vs. Dior labor dispute case to drag on for quite a while. In the latest development, the suit is moving to a French appeals court because the two sides are still splitting hairs over whether the case should be heard in a labor court, or a commercial court. That's right--there's yet to be a single argument heard.

A brief refresher: Galliano is suing Dior for a reported $7.8 million (6 million euros) for alleged wrongful termination. Back in February, a judge ruled that the designer, who had multiple contracts and a complicated employment agreement with Dior, should have his case heard in the Conseil de prud’hommes, or Labor Relations Court. At the time, Galliano's team considered it a victory. But Dior opposed that decision, preferring that its side be heard in commercial court instead, possibly because specialized labor courts tend to be more "friendly" to employees over employers. Regardless, Dior argued that Galliano was "no ordinary employee."

As of now, the Paris Court of Appeal is scheduled to again hear arguments from both sides about which court is most appropriate for the case on October 24. Galliano's attorney Chantal Giraud-van Gaver, of Coblence & Associés, told WWD that she will continue to argue that the jilted designer was an employee of LVMH and not merely a sub-contractor as Dior is arguing--thus making his case eligible for Labor Court. The trade couldn't reach Dior and John Galliano (the company) for comment.

So it seems that Galliano will eventually get his day in court. It's just going to take a while.