Lena Dunham Talks to Playboy About Not Being the 'Babest Person in the World', Keeps Her Clothes On

Considering how frequently we see Lena Dunham's breasts (just about every week on Girls), it feels somewhat natural that nudie mag Playboy caught up with her for a round of twenty questions. They get Dunham to dish on sex scenes, feminism, and her body.
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Tyler McCall
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Considering how frequently we see Lena Dunham's breasts (just about every week on Girls), it feels somewhat natural that nudie mag Playboy caught up with her for a round of twenty questions. They get Dunham to dish on sex scenes, feminism, and her body.
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Getty

Considering how frequently we see Lena Dunham's breasts (just about every week on Girls), it feels somewhat natural that nudie mag Playboy caught up with her for a round of twenty questions. They get Dunham to dish on sex scenes, feminism, and her body.

This being Playboy, Dunham is asked what she would do for a day if she woke up with a Victoria's Secret model's body. If they were hoping for a salacious answer, they were probably disappointed. Dunham says she "doesn't think [she'd] like it very much." Why?

There would be all kinds of weird challenges to deal with that I don’t have to deal with now. I don’t want to go through life wondering if people are talking to me because I have a big rack. Not being the babest person in the world creates a nice barrier. The people who talk to you are the people who are interested in you. It must be a big burden in some ways to look that way and be in public.

She does admit she would try to get a free meal or a date with "Ryan Gosling" types out of the deal, but otherwise seems uninterested in the concept.

Oh, and on the subject of her boobs, she would like that you please stop asking her why she gets them out on camera so frequently. "If I could abolish one question, it would be 'Why are you naked on TV so much?,' she tells Playboy.

So, um, why does she get naked so often?

"I don’t know. Use your imagination."

Thanks to Dunham, we don't have to.