The 3 Most Buzzed About Shows from Day 5 of Paris Fashion Week

Critics were abuzz when Haider Ackermann and Junya Watanabe went, well, a little commercial Sunday with less-tricky suiting and loads of biker jackets, respectively. All was not straight and narrow, however, for at Comme Des Garçons Rei Kawakubo took tailoring to infinity and beyond.
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Critics were abuzz when Haider Ackermann and Junya Watanabe went, well, a little commercial Sunday with less-tricky suiting and loads of biker jackets, respectively. All was not straight and narrow, however, for at Comme Des Garçons Rei Kawakubo took tailoring to infinity and beyond.
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Critics were abuzz when Haider Ackermann and Junya Watanabe went, well, a little commercial Sunday with less-tricky suiting and loads of biker jackets, respectively. All was not straight and narrow, however, for at Comme Des Garçons Rei Kawakubo took tailoring to infinity and beyond.

Photos: Imaxtree

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Comme Des Garçons Designer: Rei Kawakubo

  • "Kawakubo knows a thing or two about being rad." [Dazed Digital]
  • "There was nothing whatsoever commercial, in the traditional sense, about this collection. But Rei Kawakubo’s job is bigger than that. As ever, she invigorated her audience. And fashion." [ELLEuk.com]
  • "As ever, the workmanship on each look was outstanding, draping masses of fabric together to form giant exaggerated sleeves like wings, some padded and sculpted into abstract shapes." [i-D Online]
  • "So expansive were these ensembles, which clearly played on the whole man/woman dichotomy that fashion designers love to explore, that the models--in their spongy matted hairpieces and sturdy sneakers - had to turn to the side to let the next girl get by. It all made for a classic Comme collection. If you could ever describe anything Kawakubo does as classic." [NOWFASHION]
  • "It was interesting to see how feminine symbols, like rosettes, were absorbed into masculine tailoring--and how the masculine forms exploded into decoration." [On The Runway/

    The New York Times]

  • "If Rei Kawakubo's Comme des Garçons collection last season was about 'crushing,' a kind of nuclear fusion of clothing, this collection was the big bang. It produced, as Kawakubo titled it, 'the infinity of tailoring.'" [Style.com]
  • "Pinstripes. Bigger stripes. Prince of Wales checks. Puppytooth, houndstooth, and every other scale of canine-bite-inspired fabric weaves known to menswear manufacturers. All these, and then some, were the materials that went into Comme des Garçons’ fall exploration." [Vogue.com]
  • "Perhaps it was a comment on commercialism and business--the suit being the ultimate badge of this--and how beauty (the roses and bows here) can still grow from that? Or maybe not." [Vogue.com UK]
  • "It’s the first time this season that bad taste looked so good." [WWD]

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Haider Ackermann Designer: Haider Ackermann

  • "After several seasons of dazzling us with his artistic vision and total look, Ackermann got down to the business of creating pieces that can be more easily integrated into a woman’s wardrobe, namely beautiful outerwear, jackets and pants." [All The Rage/

    Los Angeles Times]

  • "The tricksily-ornamented jacquard suits were, as ever, impressive and elegant." [The Daily Telegraph]
  • "The languid and sometimes lethargic speed of Haider Ackermann’s shows in recent seasons, suddenly had a newfound urgency yesterday." [Dazed Digital]
  • "Yes, there was all the drama, romance and strength one would normally associate with Haider Ackermann, but he seemed to have made a concerted effort to strip back and simplify his designs--less of the binding of waists and the jackets with flaring hip panels and more of the straight and narrow." [ELLEuk.com]
  • "Knowing that said Monroe song was part of her rather sinister film Niagara, in which the bombshell played a deadly seductress out to drown her husband in the Niagara Falls, the many-sidedness to Ackermann’s autumn/winter 13 woman became all the more enthralling." [i-D Online]
  • "It was all about the two F’s of womenswear for Haider Ackermann this season--force and fragility. The designer brought those two diametrically opposite ideas together in one fantastic fall/winter 2013 show." [NOWFASHION]
  • "The collection looked less pretentious in attitude than previous seasons, but still full of smoke." [On The Runway/The New York Times]
  • "Tough, powerful, and sublimely elegant." [POPSUGAR Fashion]
  • "Fragility and strength--fashion loves to throw those two in the same pit to see what happens and in the trusted hands of Ackermann strength won but barely so." [SHOWSTUDIO]
  • "From a designer famous for straps spilling off shoulders, twisting seams, and trailing hems, the smoky gray panne velvet column gown here was notable for its spare simplicity." [Style.com]
  • "A bias-cut slither of gray velvet, baring one shoulder and looped around the neck to finish in a scarf tie was the sole grand evening statement and reminded us of the softer side of this protean talent." [Vogue.com]
  • "There's something so pure and beautiful about what French designer Haider Ackermann (the man once heavily rumoured to succeed Galliano at Dior), does. And today's collection was a wholly new, fresh and beautiful take on that." [Vogue.com UK]
  • "He’s got guts." [WWD]

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Junya Watanabe Designer: Junya Watanabe

  • "In essence, we have seen Watanabe do these things before and this collection felt like he was taking ownership of them. In the wrong hands faded denim, biker black leathers and patchwork plaid could look… well, wrong. That certainly wasn’t the case here." [Dazed Digital]
  • "When Junya Watanabe’s rebel spirit took to the catwalk yesterday--punkish hair, red lips, zippered leather, deconstructed denim, a patch of tartan here, a splash of check there--the result was quintessential Junya: the energy, colour, complexity, wit and succinctness with which he tells his story every season is truly something to behold." [ELLEuk.com]
  • "Japanese avant-garde designer Junya Watanabe delivered a collection based on the biker jacket: a garment he has continually worked into his designs. The jacket was reworked into short, structured dresses, the stiff leather on the bodice juxtaposed with softer fabrics such as wool and chiffon: one even had the look of a biker-cum-evening gown." [

    The Independent]

  • "She may have a lady bag but punk’s definitely not dead." [NOWFASHION]
  • "A nice bunch of clothes along familiar Watanabe story lines." [On The Runway/The New York Times]
  • "Watanabe seemingly presented his own past collections as the ready-mades and decided to liberally lift from himself, there was a kind of cheeky meta-fashion." [Style.com]
  • "Why is it that Junya Watanabe’s name isn’t continually lauded to the rafters as one of the Greats of fashion? His collection today proved it yet again—that he’s a unique master of cool-casual; a maker who fuses his impeccable, signature cutting with familiar street-generic clothes everyone loves, and a designer whose reality-dressing never comes without a touch of romance." [Vogue.com]
  • "What worked so successfully about this collection--there was less code-deciphering and more straight-forward wearing, jackets and jeans winning us over." [Vogue.com UK]
  • "The biker jacket has had some play on the fall runways, and on Saturday morning, Junya Watanabe took it out for a ride of his own with a fresh and intelligent spin." [WWD]