Lululemon Admits to Bad 'Testing Protocols' in Aftermath of See-Through Yoga Pants Debacle

The heads are starting to roll at Lululemon in the aftermath of that whole see-through yoga pants controversy and subsequent recall. So what does that mean for the privacy of your ass? The sheer pants issue is going to cost the company a whopping $67 million (not to mention all the embarrassing headlines about asses they've had to endure over the last few weeks), and now the company is taking action.
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The heads are starting to roll at Lululemon in the aftermath of that whole see-through yoga pants controversy and subsequent recall. So what does that mean for the privacy of your ass? The sheer pants issue is going to cost the company a whopping $67 million (not to mention all the embarrassing headlines about asses they've had to endure over the last few weeks), and now the company is taking action.
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The heads are starting to roll at Lululemon in the aftermath of that whole see-through yoga pants controversy and subsequent recall.

The sheer pants issue is going to cost the company a whopping $67 million (not to mention all the embarrassing headlines about asses they've had to endure over the last few weeks), and now the company is taking action.

Lululemon announced yesterday that its chief product officer, Sheree Waterson, who'd been with the company for five years, was stepping down.

According to the New York Times, Waterson's departure (which we're assuming wasn't voluntary, although it's never explicitly stated that she was canned--and Lulu declined to comment on whether it was because of the pants issue) is part of a reorganization plan. “As the organization matures, organizational structure changes are often required,” a Lululemon rep told the Times.

Lululemon has also issued a sort of mea culpa about the whole quality problem, and 'fessed up that their testing procedures weren't entirely up to snuff. According to a press release in the Wall Street Journal, the fabric in question, luon, theoretically met testing standards, but those testing standards were actually faulty:

While the fabric involved may have met testing standards, it was on the low end of lululemon’s tolerance scale and we have found that our testing protocols were incomplete for some of the variables in fabric characteristics. When combined with subtle style changes in pattern, the resulting end product had an unacceptable level of sheerness.

So what does this mean for future Lululemon products and the privacy of your ass?

First of all, the company is making sure that all fabrics in the pipeline now will meet standards. Second, they've assigned Lululemon employees to oversee education in contracted factories. Lastly, they're overhauling leadership and team structures.

According to the Times, Lululemon is continuing to offer customers refunds for sheer pants, but the company didn't say when to expect fresh shipments in stores.