Roger Ebert on Zoolander and Clueless

As everyone probably knows by now, Roger Ebert, beloved movie critic (and a staple of my childhood in Chicago) died yesterday. Luckily he left us reams and reams of hilarious, touching, and often snarky--in the smartest way possible--movie reviews. Here's what he had to say about two of our favorite fashion flicks, Clueless and Zoolander.
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As everyone probably knows by now, Roger Ebert, beloved movie critic (and a staple of my childhood in Chicago) died yesterday. Luckily he left us reams and reams of hilarious, touching, and often snarky--in the smartest way possible--movie reviews. Here's what he had to say about two of our favorite fashion flicks, Clueless and Zoolander.
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As everyone probably knows by now, Roger Ebert, beloved movie critic (and a staple of my childhood in Chicago) died yesterday. Luckily he left us reams and reams of hilarious, touching, and often snarky--in the smartest way possible--movie reviews.

Ebert sometimes reviewed hundreds of films per year, including some of our fave fashion flicks. His opening line for Clueless back in 1995, which he ultimately gave three and a half stars:

"So, OK, you're probably like - what is this, a Noxzema commercial?" First words of "Clueless." That's exactly what I was like. The hand-held camera was tilting crazily, showing the sun-blessed teenagers of Southern California, and I'm like - what is this, an MTV video?

He concluded his review thusly:

Heckerling walks a fine line between satire and put-on, but she finds it, and her dialogue could be anthologized.

And oh how right he was.

He didn't feel the same way about another beloved fashion flick, Zoolander (which, let's face it, is no Clueless). The movie was released just weeks after 9/11. He gave it one star.

There have been articles lately asking why the United States is so hated in some parts of the world. As this week's Exhibit A from Hollywood, I offer "Zoolander," a comedy about a plot to assassinate the prime minister of Malaysia because of his opposition to child labor. You might want to read that sentence twice. The logic: Child labor is necessary to the economic health of the fashion industry, and so its opponents must be eliminated.

Touché. Needless to say, Mr. Ebert will be sorely missed.