Alexa Chung, Amy Schumer Talk Broken Hearts, Body Image at Glamour's 'These Girls' Event

Feminism was alive and well at Glamour's 'These Girls' theater event held at Joe's Pub last night--even if it was of the post-post variety. "I've never burnt a bra, or even thought about burning a bra," said Gloria Steinem when she introduced the show which featured monologues written and performed by Emma Roberts, Dianna Agron, Alexa Chung, Amy Schumer, Lucy Punch and Zosia Mamet. Exploring feminism without submitting to cliches was definitely the theme of the night.
Avatar:
Hayley Phelan
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
25
Feminism was alive and well at Glamour's 'These Girls' theater event held at Joe's Pub last night--even if it was of the post-post variety. "I've never burnt a bra, or even thought about burning a bra," said Gloria Steinem when she introduced the show which featured monologues written and performed by Emma Roberts, Dianna Agron, Alexa Chung, Amy Schumer, Lucy Punch and Zosia Mamet. Exploring feminism without submitting to cliches was definitely the theme of the night.
Image Title4

Feminism was alive and well at Glamour's 'These Girls' theater event held at Joe's Pub last night--even if it was of the post-post variety.

"I've never burnt a bra, or even thought about burning a bra," said Gloria Steinem when she introduced the show which featured monologues written and performed by Emma Roberts, Dianna Agron, Alexa Chung, Amy Schumer, Lucy Punch and Zosia Mamet.

Exploring feminism without submitting to cliches was definitely the theme of the night. Punch opened the show explaining why she remains tech-challenged to this day: "My mother told me to never learn to type, because then I'd become some businessman's secretary, instead of becoming a businessman myself." She joked about having to explain to her agent that she didn't have email because she was a feminist. And when she finally caved (in 2004!), Punch, in her own words, "did what any good feminist would do: Got my boyfriend to set up an email account for me."

Chung opened up to the audience about surviving a broken heart. (She's still working on it).

"There are upsides to despair though," she joked. "You can wear a blanket in public instead of a coat."

The Brit it-girl shared the advice she received from her mother, friends--and Marianne Faithfull on getting over heartache. Of her Faithfull encounter, Chung explained: "It's fashion week, and I'm wasted, because that's what happens at fashion week: you get drunk and you watch alright collections and you're like [clap, clap] that was amazing. Glug glug. So I'm drunk, and I go up to her and I say, 'Marianne, how did you get over Mick Jagger?'"

Her response? "Darling, you can't believe the lyrics." Chung's mother's advice--that the best way to get over a man is to "get under another"--was a little more helpful.

Zosia Mamet also spoke about love and relationships--but her story was a tad more wholesome. "I fell in love this year," she said. "In a very major way. And it has been glorious, and arresting and the scariest fucking thing that I've ever experienced." (She also said if her boyfriend asked her to elope today she'd say yes, to which someone in the audience yelled 'ask her!' to her boyfriend who was present. We're not sure if he did but look out for ring pics.)

Image Title3

Before Amy Poehler closed the show with a rendition of Alicia Keys' 'Girl on Fire,' comedian Amy Schumer, who has a new show Inside Amy Schumer out this year, ended the monologues with a hilarious but uplifting account of a booty call gone wrong.

"Making jokes about something that's kind of painful--that's what I like to do," Schumer told us after the show. "So a one night stand that was kind of heartbreaking but also hilarious--and that was my earliest, coldest sexual experience--I like sharing that stuff."

For Schumer, it's all about confidence and self esteem--and how to "hang onto it." "With all the women I know, [confidence] seems to be a fleeting thing," she said. "We get a lot of our confidence from other people. And I'm always interested in working towards getting it from yourself."

"I think [fashion media can be] really bad for women's self-esteem," she continued. "I think it's really damaging, and it's creating an unrealistic, unhealthy standard. But like, I'm doing what I can to touch on that and hopefully make people feel a little bit better--and keep myself looking real. You won't see me looking like a bobble head anytime soon."

Watch clips from Schumer's new show below and see how hilarious she is for yourself.

On sexting:

On girls complimenting one another:

Photos: Getty