Elizabeth Hurley and Lady Gaga Go Punk

New blog Part Nouveau, or ‘partly new’, delves into fashion history to showcase the inspiration–be it art, photography or design–behind some of today’s biggest fashion moments. It’s fascinating and impossible not to get lost in, so we asked the site’s founder, Lilah Ramzi, to give us a little history lesson each week. Today's lesson? Versace's punk legacy lives on.
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New blog Part Nouveau, or ‘partly new’, delves into fashion history to showcase the inspiration–be it art, photography or design–behind some of today’s biggest fashion moments. It’s fascinating and impossible not to get lost in, so we asked the site’s founder, Lilah Ramzi, to give us a little history lesson each week. Today's lesson? Versace's punk legacy lives on.

New blog Part Nouveau, or ‘partly new’, delves into fashion history to showcase the inspiration–be it art, photography or design–behind some of today’s biggest fashion moments. It’s fascinating and impossible not to get lost in, so we asked the site’s founder, Lilah Ramzi, to give us a little history lesson each week.

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In celebration of The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s upcoming Punk: From Chaos to Couture exhibition, today’s punk-themed comparison proves the Met's thesis: That when it comes to its influence on high fashion and couture, punk is most certainly not dead.

A dress from Gianni Versace’s collection was immortalized in 1994 when then-budding star Elizabeth Hurley wore it to the London premiere of the film Four Weddings and a Funeral. The dress catapulted Hurley into the public’s eye and the dress itself became a sensation, complete with its own Wikipedia page. The Versace gown represented a reapproproiation of punk design elements into a high fashion context and will be on display at the upcoming exhibition.

Punk’s DIY slash and safety-pinned concept was transformed into a slinky, black gown revealing almost as much flesh as it concealed, with gold and silver toned safety pins clasping the high slits.

In 2012, Lady Gaga was seen wearing the same Versace dress--and it caused almost as much a stir and looked just as current and fresh as it did back in 1994--reinforcing punk’s timeless influence on high fashion.

Elizabeth Hurley in Gianni Versaci's Safety Pin Dress in May of 1994

Elizabeth Hurley in Gianni Versaci's Safety Pin Dress in May of 1994

Lady Gaga in the Safety Pin Dress, October 2, 2012

Lady Gaga in the Safety Pin Dress, October 2, 2012

For more comparisons by Part Nouveau, click here.