Delphine Arnault Moves From Dior to Second-in-Command at Louis Vuitton

Delphine Arnault, daughter of LVMH CEO Bernard Arnault and one of his heir apparents, is moving house. Miles Socha over at WWD reports that the young Arnault is heading over to Louis Vuitton in September, where she will serve as the brand's deputy general manager, reporting to CEO Michael Burke. Arnault has held the same position at Dior under CEO Sidney Toledano since 2008. There isn't much drama around this appointment, as it appears that Arnault is simply doing her due diligence and learning all aspects of the family business in the hopes that some day she may be its leader.
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Delphine Arnault, daughter of LVMH CEO Bernard Arnault and one of his heir apparents, is moving house. Miles Socha over at WWD reports that the young Arnault is heading over to Louis Vuitton in September, where she will serve as the brand's deputy general manager, reporting to CEO Michael Burke. Arnault has held the same position at Dior under CEO Sidney Toledano since 2008. There isn't much drama around this appointment, as it appears that Arnault is simply doing her due diligence and learning all aspects of the family business in the hopes that some day she may be its leader.
Delphine Arnault. Photo: Getty

Delphine Arnault. Photo: Getty

Delphine Arnault, daughter of LVMH CEO Bernard Arnault and one of his heir apparents, is moving house. Miles Socha over at WWD reports that the young Arnault is heading over to Louis Vuitton in September, where she will serve as the brand's deputy general manager, reporting to CEO Michael Burke. Arnault has held the same position at Dior under CEO Sidney Toledano since 2008.

There isn't much drama around this appointment, as it appears that Arnault is simply doing her due diligence and learning all aspects of the family business in the hopes that some day she may be its leader. Although it is interesting that it comes at a time when Marc Jacobs—whom Socha says has a close relationship with Arnault—is renegotiating his contract. If Arnault's appointment means that Louis Vuitton will be afforded the resources it needs to sustain continued growth—which is going to be increasingly difficult, even in Asia where LV is still king—it might sway Jacobs to stay. (If he's even considering leaving in the first place.)

And leaving nepotism aside, Arnault's spot at the top is a great thing for women in fashion. While there are plenty of women working in the industry, not enough hold CEO roles. (Out of the 15 highest paid fashion CEOS in the US in 2012, none of them were women.) So cheers to Arnault for doing her part to #leanin.